What are the benefits of Memory Cafés in dementia care? – Extract

benefits Memory Cafés dementia care extract

Outlining the enhancing dementia care programme developed by the editors, this book looks at the activities trialed within care homes and gives evidence of their success.

The activities presented in this book have been designed to provide meaningful engagement for residents, while respecting each individual resident’s readiness to engage and participate. This approach to person-centred care has proven to be extremely effective: activities such as Namaste Care and Memory Cafés have engaged residents who had previously not responded to interventions, demonstrably showing an increase in their levels of well-being.

In this extract, Memory Cafés Educating and Involving Residents, Relatives and Friends, Jason Corrigan-Charlesworth explores the benefits and the areas to consider when looking at developing the role of a Memory Café as part of the care home environment.

 

To read the extract click here

 

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Confused, Angry, Anxious? How to understand and tackle challenging behaviours in older people in care

challenging behaviours dementia

In this extract, the authors of Confused, Angry, Anxious? look at one of the many challenges healthcare professionals can face when working in older and dementia care. With an accessible and easy-to-read style, the authors offer advice on how to best handle challenging behaviours effectively, professionally and with confidence.

click here to read the free extract!

 

This book intends to create a link between person-centred care methods and what is described as the low arousal approach, a method which aims to manage challenging behaviours in a calm and positive manner to minimise conflict, stress and fear. With many examples of everyday challenges and how to deal with them, this book has the potential to change your (working) life.

 ‘It is not the people with dementia whose task should be to behave themselves, rather it is the caregivers whose task should be to create a context that allows these people’s everyday life to function’.

Click here to find out more about the book.

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On Grandma’s Box of Memories – interview with the creators

Jean Demetris was a primary school teacher for 22 years. 8 years ago her husband was diagnosed with Lewy body dementia. She dealt with many aspects of the condition, the highs and lows, and engaged with the many agencies involved in her husband’s care.
The experience inspired Jean and her illustrator son Alex to create a storybook for young children; to help them understand and talk about dementia with their families. We caught up with them both for a quick chat about the inspiration behind the book and what they hope it will achieve. 

Demetris-Demetr_Grandmas-Box-of_978-1-84905-993-0_colourjpg-web

 

Q1. Where did the idea for Grandma’s Box of Memories
come from?

Jean: There were two factors that prompted the idea for the book.

Firstly, when my husband was diagnosed with Lewy Body Dementia I needed information.  I found there were plenty of books on dementia for adults and some for teenagers, but hardly any for young children.

Secondly, in my husband’s nursing home I felt there was a need for more activities and stimulation for the residents.  This made me think about what could be done to encourage residents’ families and friends to participate with the residents and involve them in engaging activities.

Taking these two factors into consideration, I came up with the idea for the book that would become Grandma’s Box of Memories.

 

Q2. How did you Alex (Jean’s son) become involved in making the book?

Alex: A few months after Dad died Mum spoke to me about her idea for the book.  I liked the sound of it, so we started work on the book’s structure and on sketching out illustrations.  Soon we had put together several sample pages and before long we were very pleased to receive a commission for the full version.

I had relatively recently graduated with an MA in Illustration from Camberwell College of the Arts for which my final project had been a comic based on my family’s experiences of Dad’s dementia. Grandma’s Box of Memories represented another opportunity to work on a subject that was close to my heart.

 

Q3. Do you have any suggestions for people on how to adjust to the changes they are likely to encounter when a family member is affected by dementia?

Jean: My experience is of a family member with Lewy Body Dementia.  Different forms of dementia have different characteristics and symptoms, so the adjustments their family and friends may need to make may be different.

Dementia should not be viewed as a stigma.  Find out as much as possible about the condition from professionals and support groups.  They will be able to advise you on available help and support, so use this to your advantage.

You must accept that you have to adjust to dealing with a changed person.  Acknowledge the limitations that dementia can cause in people.  Focus on small activities and do not expect too much of the person.  Everyday tasks such as using the telephone or cooking will become difficult for people with dementia; safety around the home becomes a priority.  Social services should help you to install devices such as gas, water and personal alarms.  You can also be creative in helping the person to remain independent using small measures such as sticky notes reminding them to lock doors, close windows, or turn off taps.

If the person with dementia is alone at home it is also helpful to arrange for friends and neighbours to drop by and check they are safe.

Personal hygiene may become problematic as reluctance to bathe or change clothes can take hold, and you may need to help with these tasks.  Initially this may cause embarrassment but it can be overcome.

Patience and understanding will win out over confrontation in dealing with situations, and a sense of humour is essential.

Should your family member need residential care, try to help make it a home from home.  Enjoy going there and participate in events such as birthday celebrations.  Engage with staff and other residents.  You will encounter people you would not normally meet, which can be rewarding.

Don’t be upset when acquaintances find it difficult to engage with the person with dementia.  Some people will naturally find the situation hard to deal with.

Your lifestyle will change, sometimes quite dramatically.  Caring for a person with dementia can be hard work emotionally and physically, but don’t be hard on yourself.  Seek help – it’s there, and find time for you.  Occasional treats are a must.

 

Q4. What do you hope young readers will gain from this book?Illustration 22

Jean: Grandma’s Box of Memories is meant to be educational and entertaining; I hope readers will enjoy the story, illustrations and characters.

The book provides children with basic but helpful information about dementia, and invites readers to suggest their own ideas for items to go in a memory box.  It might also encourage children to be creative and come up with ideas of their own to support people with dementia.

Hopefully, it will help children understand that they can be part of the caring process and share their feelings and ideas with family members.

 

Q5. What should parents remember when they are explaining dementia to younger children?

Jean: Children will be aware that something is wrong but will normally accept the diagnosis of dementia given the appropriate support.  It is natural for an adult to want to protect the child yet is important to explain what is going on in a calm and clear way.  A child may experience a range of emotions, such as sadness, anxiety, anger and confusion, and will need reassurance that adults are there for them and can offer them time for discussion, both talking and listening and encouragement to ask questions.

It is important that the child understands that dementia cannot be cured but there are ways to help the person feel loved and wanted.

 

Q6. How can children be involved in the care of family members?

Jean: Most obviously, children can pay frequent visits to the person with dementia.  During these visits they can look at books and photos with the person, chat with them, listen to music and sing and dance, draw pictures, or do simple jigsaws.  They can also share small treats such as sweets and biscuits and help to peel and share pieces of fruit.

Outings to places like local parks are another way that children can be involved in caring for someone with dementia.  Sharing simple outdoor activities like playing catch or feeding ducks is fun for everybody.

Please note: if you are in the US or Canada, you can view the book information page and order your copy here.

 

The magic of puppetry in dementia care

copyrightKM2012Writing1BWIn this post Karrie Marshall, author of Puppetry in Dementia Care, describes using the power of puppetry to engage with emotions that go beyond words and memory, and how she was met with a tentative response on first suggesting the idea in adult care work.

When I first started talking about joyfulness in relation to dementia, people found that a difficult concept to consider. At conferences I noticed the majority of terms used to describe dementia conveyed a sense of hopelessness and despair. These difficult feelings are of course very real for many family carers and individuals facing a diagnosis of dementia. However, it is also important to acknowledge the real capacity for humour, positive relations, creativity and enjoyment.

My talks give examples from the book of uplifting experiences shared by people with dementia and their carers (family or paid staff). I love hearing members of the audience talk about their own experiences. People generally want better services or want to know how to improve dementia care. The talks help people see this is possible.

Throughout my career in nursing and lecturing I found people learned more and communicated better in a creative environment. My specialty is puppetry, but all art forms can reduce stress, increase confidence and improve interactions with or without words. I am interested in how we (professional care staff, family carers, relatives, artists and the general public) can use this knowledge to improve quality of lives.

Recently my talk for the Scottish Women’s Rural Institute focused on positive communication. Talks for local libraries give practical tips and creative ideas from the book. My university talks focus on person-centred care and compassion, which are major themes underpinning the book. The talks also offer opportunities to share best practice with carers and artists.

When I first introduced puppetry into adult care work, there was a hesitant response! But puppetry has a long history with adults (making social and political comment). There is also a magical quality to puppets. They engage with emotions that go beyond words or memory. I love the stories in the book that show how people with dementia focus on the puppet and completely ignore the puppeteers, the staff and the relatives!

One of the biggest challenges carers face is around relationship changes. Sometimes the nature of the dementia may mean reduced recognition of a loved one. For others the relatives are dealing with mood swings or behaviour changes. Learning how to let go of the relationship they used to have whilst maintaining a loving and meaningful connection is complex. In the book I show how this process is possible through creativity. First I explore a theory about relationships between care-givers and care-receivers that describes a progression towards alienation.  During talks, audience members give examples of feeling they are losing someone, or of drifting apart.

However, over the past ten years of working creatively with families and care staff and people with dementia, I know people can go beyond alienation. They can re-emerge into a different way of connecting that has moments of pure joy and wonderment. People have different ways of reaching this, but generally we find people with dementia get there faster!

Each experience of dementia is individual, and that is a key message in the book. Not everyone wants to be actively engaged, so we discuss the therapeutic use of silence and breathing in unison. Often I find this leads to participation. It works because people tune into where the person is. The book explores theories about human motivation and the importance of matching individual needs.

One of my favourite stories is about a man who people thought might not be interested in anything to do with creativity and certainly not puppetry.  He turned out to be one of our most enthusiastic participant puppeteers. He helped make a puppet of himself (instructions are given in the book).  This had great presence and character, as so many of the ‘soul puppets’ tend to have.  I often get a sense that the work helps us see people more clearly. Creativity has no boundaries.

It takes a long time – perhaps a lifetime – and a lot of practice to really understand what it means to be person-centred, to genuinely consider and positively respond to individual preferences. Yet this is at the heart of good dementia care. Writing the book helped me explore how we can better do this, and highlights the importance of support for carers to connect confidently and creatively.

 

 

Request a free copy of JKP’s latest catalogue on dementia

Our latest catalogue on Dementia and Elder Care is now available. With full information on our new and bestselling titles, this catalogue is a tremendous resource not only for those working with people affected by dementia, but also for family members, friends and anyone who works with the elderly. The catalogue includes practical books for professionals, manuals on how to incorporate creative approaches into dementia care, as well as guides on coping with dementia for friends, family and individuals who are themselves affected. Dementia catalogue cover

To receive a free copy of the catalogue, please sign up for our mailing listand we’ll get one out to you right away. You may also request multiple copies to share with friends, family, colleagues and clients–simply note how many copies of the catalogue you would like (up to 20) in the ‘any additional comments’ box on the sign-up form.

We hope you will take advantage of this opportunity to get more information about our outstanding new titles such as Dementia – Support for Family and Friends by Dave Pulsford and Rachel Thompson and Can I tell you about Dementia? by Jude Welton. The catalogue also features information on bestselling titles such as Leadership for Person-Centered Dementia Care  by Buz Loveday and Playfulness and Dementia by John Killick, as well moving personal accounts of the experience of dementia such as Dancing with Dementia and  Who will I be when I die?  from Christine Bryden.

Click this link to see a listing of new and recent titles from Jessica Kingsley Publishers’ Dementia list.

To request a copy of the JKP catalogue of books on Dementia and Elder Care, please click here to fill out our sign-up sheet. Please be sure to click any additional areas of interest as well. You should receive a copy of the catalogue within two weeks.