How can so many faiths live peacefully together in a society?

Live well together

As the landscape of our society evolves and becomes ever more multi-cultural and ethnically diverse, one of the biggest elephants in the room has been how we will manage to inspire and create a harmonious society. With so many differing and distinct beliefs living side-by-side, it is sadly little wonder that there are increasing amounts of alienation, prejudice, discrimination, bigotry and racism. A darker, more sectarian society seems to have bludgeoned its way to the surface to exert its noisy influence on social media, tabloid press and sometimes even the national news.

Learning to Live Well Together engages with the issue, offering insights into forging strong relationships with those you have differing religious beliefs from, important for all professionals whose work is impacted by religious diversity. In this extract from the book Tom Wilson discusses ‘trust’, the issues surrounding it, and how to go about building it using his wealth of experience gained from work at the St Philip’s Centre in Leicester.

Click the link below to read an exclusive extract from Learning to Live Well Together by Tom Wilson and Riaz Ravat

Read the extract

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Give children their childhood back… or we’ll be paying for years to come

de-thierry-reev_simple-guide-to_978-1-78592-136-0_colourjpg-webBetsy de Thierry, author of The Simple Guide to Child Trauma, discusses the pressures on children and young people and how societal influences are causing an increase in anxiety and depression.

Some recent data has become available which gives evidence to our experience in the services we are running in the UK.

• 235,000 young people in England were in contact with NHS mental health services at the end of June 2016
• Almost a quarter of a million children and young people are receiving help from NHS mental health services for problems such as anxiety, depression and eating disorders
• 235,189 people aged 18 and under get specialist care, according to data covering 60% of mental health trusts in England (11,849 boys and girls aged five and under among those getting help)
(The Guardian. 3rd October 2016)
• NHS study finds:
   o 12.6% of women aged 16-24 screen positive for PTSD
   o 19.7% self-harm
   o 28.2% have mental health condition 
   o Between 1993 and 2014 there was a 35% rise in adults reporting severe symptoms of common mental disorders.
(The Guardian. 26th October 2016)

Children have never been so stressed and lacking in healthy relational experience. The irony is that parents are hugely stressed too, often with the need to earn enough money to buy their children what they think they need to stop them being bullied (the right brands or electronics). How ironic and sad.

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