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Our adoption and fostering resources offer valuable guidance on important issues including attachment and trauma parenting, foster and residential care, life story work, education and schools, creative therapies, transracial adoption, parenting teens, special educational needs and more.  We also have a great set of therapeutic children’s books to help them manage big feelings.

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Browse our latest collection of books for adoptive and foster parents.

Here are our new and bestselling titles for adoptive and foster parents, or those thinking of adopting or fostering. For more information on any of the books inside, simply click the link icon next to the cover image to view the full book page.

Browse our latest collection of new and bestselling titles for professionals in adoption and foster care.

Here are our new and bestselling titles for professionals working in adoption and fostering. For more information on any of the books inside, simply click link icon next to the title or cover image to view the full book page.

Attachment, schools and vulnerable children: An interview with Nicola Marshall.

Nicola Marshall is a certified coach, adoptive parent of three, and author of the newly published The Teacher’s Introduction to Attachment. We spoke to her about why she wanted to write a book on attachment for teachers, what she’s learned since starting her own training company for teachers and other school staff, and she shares her number one tip for educators working with vulnerable children. 

1) How did you become interested in attachment?

My husband and I adopted three children 6 years ago now and I became interested in attachment as a result of trying to understand the impact my children’s early years experience has had on them. Throughout the adoption journey Attachment was mentioned and it fascinated me to know that so much of what we do in our adult lives is a result of our early experiences. I’ve always believed this actually, as someone who has always been interested in people and how they tick, to know that how we build relationships comes from much of our early experiences made sense.

Since looking into attachment I can see how important all our relationships are and it’s a constant journey of discovery.

2) Why did you decide to write a book on attachment for teachers?Marshall_Teachers-Introd_978-1-84905-550-5_colourjpg-print

There are many books available on Attachment and I’ve read quite a few of them. They are brilliant in lots of ways but I also have found that they can be quite heavy and time intensive. If you are really interested in the subject, as I am, then there are brilliant books to further your understanding such as Bruce Perry or Dan Hughes books.

However whilst doing training for schools and other people working with children I have found that there’s a reluctance to read some of the more academic books on the subject. As a parent and a down to earth person myself I felt there was a gap in the market for a book that was accessible to all teaching staff, whether they are time pressured or just not that interested in the subject. This book is an easy to read, practical and very accessible and my desire is that anyone and everyone working with children of any description would read this and find it helpful.

 3) You run training programmes to help educate teachers and other school staff about attachment – what have you learned whilst doing this?

I have loved training educators over the last three years in this subject. The people who attend the courses are so dedicated and committed to the children they serve that it has been an inspiration to me. I have seen that many are under immense pressure to get children to learn who are just not ready to learn. The pressures on resources, funding and time are creating a system that seems to be a hindrance to vulnerable children out there who need patience, time and nurture given to them in order that they can learn.

Through the workshops and onsite training I’ve run and the hundreds of educators I’ve spoken to I can see that this is a vocation – you have to have a calling to be an educator as what you want to do and what you’re allowed to do many times don’t match up. I wish our educational system was more flexible as I know it’s not for want of trying on the front-line staffs side – they understand that we need a different approach with some children, that we need to be their parent, carer, therapist and social worker sometimes as the adults they meet at school may be all they have.

4) Can you think of a case study or example of having school staff educated in attachment, which has led to direct benefits for a child or group of children?

I can think of many schools and particularly children who have benefited from more of an awareness of Attachment. A few spring to mind. One child who is from a very small, rural school – his teacher came on my workshop a few years ago, the training impacted her and it helped her to understand his behaviours. However it didn’t seem enough. So this year I was asked to go and observe the child in school and to give some recommendations on what practical strategies they could use to help him. After two days we sat down with the parent of this child and discussed what had been observed. It was great to see that for that parent it was so important to know that someone could see the anxieties and fears her child was desperately trying to hide. We talked about practical ways to build relationships with him and to help him feel safe. As a result I am sure he will flourish in that very nurturing and caring school.

More locally to me, a High School have taken on the challenge of really trying to understand a complex child in year 8 who has an ambivalent attachment. Many of the schools sanctions do not work for this child and in fact send her on a spiral of negative behaviours as a result. With training and talking with the parents the school are using different strategies to try and help her feel safe and to take control of her regulation, so that she can settle to learn. The result of this for the child is that she can start to learn in school instead of just surviving but also the staff members are happier as they don’t have to keep enforcing sanctions that do not work. Finally, this child is not distracting the other children in the class, so they can learn too.

5) What would be your number one tip for teachers or other staff working with vulnerable children?

Look beneath the behaviours to the root. All behaviour communicates something. For children who have experienced early trauma their behaviours very often are how they express themselves. They are not ‘naughty’ children trying to manipulate. They are frightened, anxious children who will use any means at their disposal to feel safe and get their needs met. When you can see that and truly appreciate that then you can begin to meet their needs and the behaviour will change in time.

 You can find out more about Nicola’s book here.  You can also find out more about her training company, BraveHeart Education, and the work they do training educators in attachment and its implications for the classroom, here 

On Grandma’s Box of Memories – interview with the creators

Jean Demetris was a primary school teacher for 22 years. 8 years ago her husband was diagnosed with Lewy body dementia. She dealt with many aspects of the condition, the highs and lows, and engaged with the many agencies involved in her husband’s care.
The experience inspired Jean and her illustrator son Alex to create a storybook for young children; to help them understand and talk about dementia with their families. We caught up with them both for a quick chat about the inspiration behind the book and what they hope it will achieve. 

Demetris-Demetr_Grandmas-Box-of_978-1-84905-993-0_colourjpg-web

 

Q1. Where did the idea for Grandma’s Box of Memories
come from?

Jean: There were two factors that prompted the idea for the book.

Firstly, when my husband was diagnosed with Lewy Body Dementia I needed information.  I found there were plenty of books on dementia for adults and some for teenagers, but hardly any for young children.

Secondly, in my husband’s nursing home I felt there was a need for more activities and stimulation for the residents.  This made me think about what could be done to encourage residents’ families and friends to participate with the residents and involve them in engaging activities.

Taking these two factors into consideration, I came up with the idea for the book that would become Grandma’s Box of Memories.

 

Q2. How did you Alex (Jean’s son) become involved in making the book?

Alex: A few months after Dad died Mum spoke to me about her idea for the book.  I liked the sound of it, so we started work on the book’s structure and on sketching out illustrations.  Soon we had put together several sample pages and before long we were very pleased to receive a commission for the full version.

I had relatively recently graduated with an MA in Illustration from Camberwell College of the Arts for which my final project had been a comic based on my family’s experiences of Dad’s dementia. Grandma’s Box of Memories represented another opportunity to work on a subject that was close to my heart.

 

Q3. Do you have any suggestions for people on how to adjust to the changes they are likely to encounter when a family member is affected by dementia?

Jean: My experience is of a family member with Lewy Body Dementia.  Different forms of dementia have different characteristics and symptoms, so the adjustments their family and friends may need to make may be different.

Dementia should not be viewed as a stigma.  Find out as much as possible about the condition from professionals and support groups.  They will be able to advise you on available help and support, so use this to your advantage.

You must accept that you have to adjust to dealing with a changed person.  Acknowledge the limitations that dementia can cause in people.  Focus on small activities and do not expect too much of the person.  Everyday tasks such as using the telephone or cooking will become difficult for people with dementia; safety around the home becomes a priority.  Social services should help you to install devices such as gas, water and personal alarms.  You can also be creative in helping the person to remain independent using small measures such as sticky notes reminding them to lock doors, close windows, or turn off taps.

If the person with dementia is alone at home it is also helpful to arrange for friends and neighbours to drop by and check they are safe.

Personal hygiene may become problematic as reluctance to bathe or change clothes can take hold, and you may need to help with these tasks.  Initially this may cause embarrassment but it can be overcome.

Patience and understanding will win out over confrontation in dealing with situations, and a sense of humour is essential.

Should your family member need residential care, try to help make it a home from home.  Enjoy going there and participate in events such as birthday celebrations.  Engage with staff and other residents.  You will encounter people you would not normally meet, which can be rewarding.

Don’t be upset when acquaintances find it difficult to engage with the person with dementia.  Some people will naturally find the situation hard to deal with.

Your lifestyle will change, sometimes quite dramatically.  Caring for a person with dementia can be hard work emotionally and physically, but don’t be hard on yourself.  Seek help – it’s there, and find time for you.  Occasional treats are a must.

 

Q4. What do you hope young readers will gain from this book?Illustration 22

Jean: Grandma’s Box of Memories is meant to be educational and entertaining; I hope readers will enjoy the story, illustrations and characters.

The book provides children with basic but helpful information about dementia, and invites readers to suggest their own ideas for items to go in a memory box.  It might also encourage children to be creative and come up with ideas of their own to support people with dementia.

Hopefully, it will help children understand that they can be part of the caring process and share their feelings and ideas with family members.

 

Q5. What should parents remember when they are explaining dementia to younger children?

Jean: Children will be aware that something is wrong but will normally accept the diagnosis of dementia given the appropriate support.  It is natural for an adult to want to protect the child yet is important to explain what is going on in a calm and clear way.  A child may experience a range of emotions, such as sadness, anxiety, anger and confusion, and will need reassurance that adults are there for them and can offer them time for discussion, both talking and listening and encouragement to ask questions.

It is important that the child understands that dementia cannot be cured but there are ways to help the person feel loved and wanted.

 

Q6. How can children be involved in the care of family members?

Jean: Most obviously, children can pay frequent visits to the person with dementia.  During these visits they can look at books and photos with the person, chat with them, listen to music and sing and dance, draw pictures, or do simple jigsaws.  They can also share small treats such as sweets and biscuits and help to peel and share pieces of fruit.

Outings to places like local parks are another way that children can be involved in caring for someone with dementia.  Sharing simple outdoor activities like playing catch or feeding ducks is fun for everybody.

Please note: if you are in the US or Canada, you can view the book information page and order your copy here.

 

Why helping traumatised children find the right words is so important.

Jane Evans, trauma parenting specialist and author of How Are You Feeling Today Baby Bear? writes about the importance of helping children who have experienced domestic abuse or other trauma to identify and talk about their feelings.

Early years children affected by domestic violence need help to find the words for their big feelings sooner rather than later.

Being able to recognise how we feel at any given moment is essential to our well-being, decision making and the way we relate to others and behave every day. Being able to understand and put into words our own feelings and those of others is also essential for our mental health and safety, never more so than when we are children. If a child can’t recognise the signs in their body of fear, anxiety, frustration, excitement and joy then they will struggle to tell the difference between them and this can make them vulnerable.

All illustrations by Laurence Jackson

All illustrations by Laurence Jackson

When it comes to children who have lived through domestic violence, or other trauma, matching words to their feelings and their bodily state, as early as possible, is even more vital. Post domestic violence, children need to be able to make some sense of the things they have seen, heard, felt, smelt, and even tasted. Without support to learn to do this, their emotional memories will remain unprocessed within them which will affect all aspects of their onward journey, especially their physical and mental health.

For any child being able to understand the emotions they have means they can feel less overwhelmed by them. Anyone who has seen a pre or early verbal child get frustrated because they can’t make you understand they wanted the purple cup and not the green one you have given them, will know what I mean! They may become distressed but not have the words to describe their inner state and how much the purple cup means to them and this can escalate in to an emotional overload of frustration, or they will learn to give up and switch off from trying to communicate their distress, which is never a good thing.

For those living and working with children who have, or may have, lived with domestic violence, How are you feeling today Baby Bear?, has been created to begin this vital work of enabling the children to find a voice. It can also be used sensitively in situations where an assessment of a child’s view of how they felt at home needs to be known and considered to for their future or immediate well-being and safety, such as a safeguarding or court based assessment.

Gentle suggestion and exploration done patiently and sensitively can begin the process of filling a child’s ‘feelings machine’.  Imagine a Las Vegas style slot machine as being the child, adults keep pulling the handle down to get a ‘pay out’ of feelings. “Tell me how you feel about hitting your brother/being in trouble at school/being in time out again?” “How do you think I feel about hearing you hurt someone again/didn’t do as you were asked again/finding your torn up book?” The handle is pulled repeatedly but as no one has put any dollars in the machine there are none to pay out. However, each time we explore and name a feeling with even a tiny baby, “oh I think you might be sad/worried/cross/excited”, we put a dollar in the slot machine then eventually there can be a ‘pay out!’

In homes where adults are involved in domestic violence, one carrying it out and the other trying to avoid it and protect themselves and their children from it, there is no time to have every day feelings based conversations. Once the family is safely out of it the feelings work needs to begin gently and in small ways as soon as is possible. Young children’s brains are developing and wiring up very rapidly based on what they experience and are exposed too. Connecting words to the signals their body is giving them is vital to enabling them to sort through and regulate feelings which are too big for them to live with in a healthy way.How Are You Feeling Today baby Bear? cover

How are you feeling today Baby Bear? is designed to be a tool to begin this important work with young children to enable their early year’s mental and emotional development to give them a better emotionally informed foundation for life. It is a gentle book which gives permission, insight and those all-important words to children who need to begin to process their memories of feeling frightened and confused so they can get on with being children.

You can find out more about Jane’s work, upcoming events and read more of her blog posts on her website: http://www.parentingposttrauma.co.uk/

 

You can also follow her on twitter: @janeparenting

Introduction to the Psychology of Ageing for Non-Specialists – a free extract.

Stuart-Hamilton_Introduction-to_978-1-84905-363-1_colourjpg-printIn this extract from the Introduction to the Psychology of Ageing for Non-Specialists author Professor Ian Stuart-Hamilton explains a little about the idea behind this edition and the audience he wrote it for.

For a free sneak peek, just click the link below to read the preface from the book.

An Introduction to the Psychology of Ageing – preface

You can find out more about the book, read reviews and order your copy here.

Karen Watchman on Intellectual Disability and Dementia

Karen Watchman, Lecturer in Dementia at the Alzheimer Scotland Centre for Policy and Practice, and editor of the new book Intellectual Disability and Dementia, joined us for a short interview. She talks about how she became involved in the field, and gives her advice for those working with and supporting people with intellectual disabilities and dementia.

How did you get involved with this area of study?
I spent many years as Director of Down’s Syndrome Scotland where I worked alongside families and people with Down syndrome of all ages. There was even less research conducted about dementia in people with intellectual disabilities at that time which spurred me on to complete a Masters degree in Dementia followed by a PhD researching the experiences of people with Down syndrome and dementia. So, whilst I have an academic interest in this area I am very much grounded in practice and in ensuring that information is made available in an accessible format.
My Great Aunt had Down syndrome and, unusually for the period in which she grew up, lived at home with family into her adult years. So it came as no surprise when research started showing the link between quality of life and increased life expectancy.

 

People with disabilities are living for longer and as a result we are seeing more people with intellectual disabilities than ever develop dementia as they age. What training is available for carers and professionals to help deal with this increase?Watchman Intellectual Disability and Dementia 9781849054225
Typically in the UK, staff, volunteers and carers supporting people with an intellectual disability do not have training in dementia. Similarly, staff supporting older people with dementia do not have training in intellectual disabilities, despite many younger people (especially with Down syndrome) being diagnosed, and some moved inappropriately to care homes for older people.
This is slowly starting to change but there is still not enough interdisciplinary exchange of learning. Training and courses that I deliver where staff attend from across sectors are very valuable, as participants learn from each other. However, it is not just intellectual disability or dementia services – equally important, especially as dementia progresses, is the input of all allied health and palliative professions and that there is partnership working with all services talking to each other and to carers, and all being consistent in their approach.

 

 

Are they any particular methods or activities which are helpful in explaining a dementia diagnosis to someone with an intellectual disability?
This is an area addressed in the book and is something that doesn’t receive enough attention currently. As a result there is inconsistency in practice. Information about a diagnosis or suspected diagnosis of dementia is not routinely shared with the person who has an intellectual disability, despite UK dementia strategies maintaining that everyone has a right to know of their diagnosis. We need to think more about how this can be done with people who have an intellectual disability and embrace non-verbal communication methods too.

 

 

What should staff or carers be aware of in order to be able to support people with an intellectual disability and dementia?
Someone who already works alongside people with an intellectual disability is likely to have been trained to support people to maximise their independence, to work towards independent living or community involvement to the best of their ability. Their work will be person centred and will be focused on the needs of each individual. There is an element or re-learning required by staff when the person with an intellectual disability has a diagnosis of dementia. The work should still be person centred and based around the individual but as capacity and cognitive ability change there is an associated need to change the way that staff, volunteers, family and friends provide support.
Carers also need information about interventions – this may or may not include medication. Social interventions such as meaningful activities and life story work are also essential. Awareness of contraindications with medication is important especially as many people with intellectual disabilities are over-prescribed anti-psychotic medication.
Specific knowledge of dementia that needs to be shared with staff, volunteers, family and friends include: what dementia is, different types of dementia and how each affects the person, early signs (this can differ from early signs in older people without an intellectual disability), environmental adaptation to ensure that accommodation is appropriate to the persons changing needs, communication changes and physical changes that will occur as the condition progresses. I am often asked for help with what is perceived as a behavioural issue, but with appropriate information or training there is a realisation that if we get the environment, communicating and our approach right – this is what has caused the changes in behaviour.  We need to work out the triggers and acknowledge our role in this – often a change in behaviour is caused by us not understanding the person and not providing appropriate support.

Intellectual Disability and Dementia is due to be published May 2014. 
Karen Watchman is the editor of the book as well as an experienced expert in working with intellectual disabilities. 

 

The Inspiration behind ‘How Are You Feeling Today Baby Bear?’

Trauma Parenting Specialist and author of  How Are You Feeling Today Baby Bear? Jane Evans explains the inspiration behind the book.

Why I wrote How Are You Feeling Today Baby Bear?

From the time I was a little girl I have loved children’s books and, for the past 22 years since becoming a parent, step-parent and grandparent I have totally loved children! My professional life has been an extension of this love for them.

My work has regularly brought me into the lives of families living through the most difficult of times. For many this has been domestic abuse and violence, mental illness, addiction, homelessness, poverty and child abuse. It has always been a privilege to sit alongside them and to learn from them. My life has been full of ups and downs, my battles with mental illness and beyond domestic abuse and through it all, in one way or another; it has always been children who have been the light at the end of the various dark tunnels.

How Are You Feeling Today baby Bear? cover

For many, many years I have had a burning desire to write a book for children which would be of real use to them. In my work with children I have used story books to give them chances to explore, in a gentle way, how they might feel about complex issues they have no words for.  When I worked as a Parenting Worker with families affected by domestic abuse and violence, their parents and carers kept asking me for a suitable book to share with their youngest children who had seen and heard  arguing, fighting and other abuse.

Sadly, I have repeatedly been struck by how much the children I have worked with have struggled to find the words to describe their feelings. For most of them it has been like learning another language and has been a slow process of trying to make up for a vital missing part of their developmental journey. Similarly their parents have often shown and told me how they too have found this difficult both for themselves and with their children.

Never was this more evident than when I was working alongside families’ post domestic violence and abuse, especially those with very young children. “Is there a book I can read with them?”, parents and carers would ask me; I struggled to find the right one which would give a child opportunities to learn about the words for their feelings without being scared, or without being ‘told’ how they  might feel.

All illustrations by Laurence Jackson

All illustrations by Laurence Jackson

Finally the time came to put the words and images I had created in my mind, from thinking about how a very young child feels during and in the aftermath of domestic violence, down on paper! Baby Bear was ‘born’ with two Big Bears who are having a difficult relationship, which often erupts into arguing and fighting, all of which is heard and felt by Baby Bear.

My hope is that How are you feeling today Baby Bear? will help families and young children post domestic violence and abuse to put feelings into words, rather than feeling their only option  is to express these difficult emotions via their behaviour.  Happier, healthier children with a closer connection to caring adults will offer them the onward journey they so deserve.

You can find out more about Jane’s work, upcoming events and read more of her blog posts on her website: http://www.parentingposttrauma.co.uk/

You can also follow her on twitter: @janeparenting