The Recovery Letters: Addressed to People Experiencing Depression

James Withey, a trained counsellor who worked in social care for 20 years, was diagnosed with clinical depression, attempted suicide and spent time in psychiatric hospital and crisis services where he developed the idea for The Recovery Letters. He met Olivia Sagan, Head of Psychology & Sociology at Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, and a chartered psychologist and former counsellor, when she contacted him directly as she had seen The Recovery Letters website. Both keen to work together to do the book, and with the mix of academic backgrounds and personal experiences in mental health, it was a great match. 

In 2012, The Recovery Letters was launched to host a series of letters online written by people recovering from depression, addressed to those currently affected by a mental health condition. Addressed to ‘Dear You’, the inspirational and heartfelt letters provided hope and support to those experiencing depression and were testament that recovery was possible.

Below are two letters from the book:

Read letter one here

Read letter two here

 


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Simon McCarthy-Jones talks to Human Givens

McCarthySimon McCarthy-Jones, author of Can’t You Hear Them?, talks to Human Givens about what is known – and what has been ignored – in explaining the experience of hearing voices. 

The experience of ‘hearing voices’, once associated with lofty prophetic communications, has fallen low. Today, the experience is typically portrayed as an unambiguous harbinger of madness caused by a broken brain, an unbalanced mind, biology gone wild. Yet an alternative account, forged predominantly by people who hear voices themselves, argues that hearing voices is an understandable response to traumatic life-events. There is an urgent need to overcome the tensions between these two ways of understanding ‘voice hearing’.

Read the interview here

 


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Peace Inside: How meditation can transform your mental health

peaceSam Settle, editor of Peace Inside, examines how the time tested practice of meditation – sitting in silence and paying attention to the breath – is helping people maintain a healthy mind behind bars.

“If you don’t go into prison with a mental health problem, then you’re very likely to pick one up while you’re there. And if you do have a pre-existing condition – and many people who come into prison do – it’s probably going to get worse while you’re inside.” So said the head of the mental health team at an Oxfordshire prison, speaking recently to yoga teachers at a training run by our charity, the Prison Phoenix Trust (PPT). Part of the PPT’s work is setting up yoga and meditation classes in prisons, training and supporting qualified teachers for this unusual work. There are currently 144 classes in 79 UK and Irish prisons.

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How important is empathy within our care system?

Frightened

Bo Hejlskov Elvén is a Clinical Psychologist, and author of Frightened, Disturbed, Dangerous?, Disruptive, Stubborn, Out of Control?, Confused, Angry, Anxious? and Sulky, Rowdy, Rude?, based in Sweden. He is an independent consultant and lecturer on autism and challenging behaviour, and an accredited Studio III trainer. In 2009, he was awarded the Puzzle Piece of the Year prize by the Swedish Autism Society for his lecturing and counselling on challenging behaviour. 

Frightened, Disturbed, Dangerous? Those words are often used to describe people in psychiatric care. Historically, schizophrenia is one of our oldest diagnoses still in use. Our oldest diagnoses describe people whose behaviour was unpredictable and clearly different than that of other people. Today, we still see descriptions of people with psychiatric conditions described as disturbed and dangerous despite all the knowledge we have contradicting those descriptions. The words we use to describe people affect the way we think about them and our methods for working with them. If we believe that a person is dangerous, we will keep our distance and even react faster to the person’s behaviour. We are also more prone to react with force.

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Why does someone with Asperger’s syndrome become depressed? Read the first chapter from Tony Attwood & Michelle Garnett’s new book

Attwood-Garnett_Exploring-Depre_978-1-84905-502-4_colourjpg-printPeople with Asperger’s syndrome are at greater risk of becoming depressed for a number of reasons that leave them with a tendency to isolate themselves. In the opening chapter of Tony Attwood and Michelle Garnett’s new book Exploring Depression and Beating the Blues: A CBT Self-Help Guide to Understanding and Coping with Depression in Asperger’s Syndrome [ASD-Level 1] the authors explore these reasons and introduce their self-help programme for dealing with the issues that might lead someone with Asperger’s syndrome to experience feelings of depression.

Drawing on the latest thinking and research Attwood & Garnett use Cognitive Behavioural Therapy methods designed specifically for individuals with Asperger’s syndrome (ASD-level 1) to help increase self-awareness, identify personal triggers, and provide all the tools needed to combat depression and suicidal thought.

You can read the first chapter from Exploring Depression and Beating the Blues: A CBT Self-Help Guide to Understanding and Coping with Depression in Asperger’s Syndrome [ASD-Level 1] simply by clicking on the link below.


Chapter 1: Why Does Someone With Asperger’s Syndrome Become Depressed? CLICK HERE TO READ  

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Hearing Voices, Living Fully Launch Party

Claire Bien, Associate Director of Communications at The Connection, Inc. and trained facilitator at the Hearing Voices Network, shares her thoughts and a few fun snapshots from the launch party for her new book, Hearing Voices, Living Fully: Living with the Voices in My Head.

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Personality disorder: What about recovery?

Exploring the process of recovery from personality disorder, and how this can be achieved, Heather Castillo, author of The Reality of Recovery in Personality Disorder, provides some insight about the concept of recovery in relation to personality disorder.

Castillo-Realityof Recovery-C2W
Twenty years ago, personality disorder was defined as enduring and inflexible and was usually considered untreatable.   If I had moments of doubt, regarding embarking on a study of this human puzzle, they weren’t many.  The adversity experienced by those who had attracted the diagnosis was too compelling.  The assumption that professionals know best how conditions should be defined, and how services should be configured, was a similarly popular perception at that time.

My subsequent twenty-year journey concerned research with people diagnosed with personality disorder.  Driven by the ideas and needs of service users, our ensuing service developments aimed to build a new model of understanding and progress, one which could even make the old ways obsolete.  The early 2000s proved to be a fertile time for innovation when the Department of Health invested in pilot services which allowed a kind of exploratory latitude that I have not experienced before or since.  This gave us heaven-sent liberty to create a new and very different kind of service and a golden opportunity to extend our research studies.  At this time there was no agreed rationale of recovery for those diagnosed with personality disorder and few researchers had sought the views of service users regarding this.  We wished to continue to explore research methods that incorporated subjective accounts of recovery because we believed that professionals would find little guidance about what might help recovery from a medically-oriented randomized controlled trial.

The concept of recovery essentially arose in the service user movement, however, it was an idea which was soon hijacked by mainstream services becoming a clinical concept concerned with cure.  This was experienced as an unrealistic expectation and a burden to get well.  The word recovery has different meanings suggesting that conceptual clarity is necessary.  First is the traditional concept of recovery as cure which is located within an illness framework.  Second is the personal definition of recovery which has emerged from service user narratives.  These accounts emphasize the understanding of recovery as a process that can still take place in the presence of symptoms and disability.  Recovery is about finding abilities, possibilities, interests and dreams.  This was a crucial concern for our research group members and they set out to define recovery in their own terms.  They believed that the term recovery implied returning to a previous state of being, whereas members were seeking to create a new future, the future they wanted.  Standing on the firm foundations of a clearly defined concept of personal recovery, by 2004 we had established our new service.  I have long believed that, as human beings, thriving is our default setting.  Up to now this had not proven to be the case for our service users, however, the homeliness and peacefulness of the new service and the sense of hope that permeated the air had an effect on all of us.

Living too long with untenable emotions and in a state of chronic hyper-arousal, people with a personality disorder diagnosis frequently adopt dysfunctional behaviors to numb unbearable feelings and to swiftly bring their mood down to a manageable level.  Hurting the body can create temporary calm because of endorphin release.  Such behaviors include self-harm and substance misuse.  This is how people have coped and, for many, they become deeply ingrained coping strategies.  The damaging expression of pain needs containing measures, therefore, to create psychological safety at the new service these self-destructive behaviours needed to be actively challenged.  An Acceptable Behaviour Policy was created in collaboration with service users and administered by them.  If someone broke the rules laid out in this policy there were consequences, and that person would be invited to a community discussion with peers.  During the course of our research 51 (85% of participants) discussed the use of negative coping strategies and 46 (over 76% of participants) reported a dramatic reduction in their use, suggesting that the concept of boundaries had become internalized.

Initially we were engaged in developing healthy attachment in terms of safety and trust, feeling cared for, a sense of belonging, and learning acceptable boundaries.  Next we discovered that only when this was sufficiently consolidated did service users begin to learn to contain their past experiences and build necessary skills to progress.  Meaningful therapy cannot take place, no matter how desperately it is needed, if trust does not exist and if behaviour is chaotic, risky and destructive.  Healing is about integrating experience by making sense of what has happened.  Prior to this stage, reality often proved to be unbearable and making sense out of traumatic experiences and child abuse is a difficult thing to do.  This marked the long process of beginning to re-frame traumatic experience.   However, a focus on a deficit in skills, and all that has gone wrong in the past, can create a sense of hopelessness.  Therefore, the fostering of hope and the building of confidence became vitally important in activating the internal resources necessary to conceive of and pursue dreams and goals.

Supporting recovery is about helping people to build self-esteem and identity and to find valued roles in society.  This began to translate into internal changes concerning sense of self and external achievements in the various domains of social inclusion.  However, despite progress, significant fears and barriers to the concept of recovery were also highlighted in relation to risking what progress had been made.  Because the word recovery could potentially become synonymous with the idea of loss of support, it became essential to further define it in a tenable way.  As a result, the concept of Transitional Recovery was born, meaning that progress would be defined as an ongoing journey of small steps, involving the retention of new-found healthy attachment, and new structures were incorporated into the service to help build confidence with outdoor-well-being pursuits and social inclusion initiatives.

Developments which stemmed from the  unique knowledge of service users, about what would best support them and help them to progress, shows that it is possible to work effectively with a relatively large number of people with a personality disorder diagnosis, well in excess of a hundred at one time, at different stages in their journey of recovery, many of whom had not made progress in other service settings, resulting in significant financial savings to the health, social care and the criminal justice system.

Dr Heather Castillo worked for many years in Mind organisations in Essex, developing advocacy for people with mental health problems. She has worked with service users, training and supporting them to become legitimate researchers in the field of mental health. In 2004 she helped to set up, and became the Chief Executive of The Haven Project, which began as a Department of Health National Innovation Site for the support and treatment of personality disorder. In 2011 she completed a doctorate at Anglia Ruskin University, UK, about the process of recovery in personality disorder. She lives in Essex, UK.

Learn more about The Reality of Recovery in Personality Disorder

2014 Living Now Book Awards JKP/SD Medal Winners Announced!

The Living Now Book Awards were established in 2008 to honor life-changing books, and to bring increased recognition to the year’s best lifestyle, homestyle, world-improvement and self-improvement titles. The awards celebrate the innovation and creativity of books that enhance the quality of life. The gold, silver and bronze medalists in the 2014 Living Now Book Awards highlight titles that represent some of the fastest-growing segments in book publishing today.

We are proud and excited to announce that one book from Jessica Kingsley Publishers and two books from our Singing Dragon imprint have been selected as Medal Winners!

From the Jessica Kingsley Publishers list…Final Chapters: Writings About the End of Life

Gold Medal WinnerGold Medal Winner in Grieving/Death & Dying
Final Chapters: Writings About the End of Life
Edited by Roger Kirkpatrick

 

 

From Singing Dragon…Chasing the Phantom: In Pursuit of Myth and Meaning in the Realm of the Snow Leopard

Gold Medal WinnerGold Medal Winner in Enlightenment/Spirituality
Chasing the Phantom: In Pursuit of Myth and Meaning in the Realm of the Snow Leopard
by Eduard Fischer

 

Bronze Medal Winner

Bronze Medal Winner in Healing Arts/Bodywork/Energy Techniques
Qigong and Chinese Self-Massage for Everyday Health Care: Ways to Address Chronic Health Issues and to Improve Your Overall Health Based on Chinese Medicine Techniques
Compiled by Zeng Qingnan

 

 

 

 

 

Jessica Kingsley Publishers/Singing Dragon would like to congratulate our 2014 Living Now Book Award Winning authors.

For more information on Living Now Book Awards or to see the full list of 2014 Medal Winners, please click here.

Browse our latest collection of new and bestselling titles in counselling and psychotherapy

Here are our new and bestselling titles in counselling and psychotherapy. For more information on any of the books inside, simply click the title or cover image to view the full book page.

Karen Watchman on Intellectual Disability and Dementia

Karen Watchman, Lecturer in Dementia at the Alzheimer Scotland Centre for Policy and Practice, and editor of the new book Intellectual Disability and Dementia, joined us for a short interview. She talks about how she became involved in the field, and gives her advice for those working with and supporting people with intellectual disabilities and dementia.

How did you get involved with this area of study?
I spent many years as Director of Down’s Syndrome Scotland where I worked alongside families and people with Down syndrome of all ages. There was even less research conducted about dementia in people with intellectual disabilities at that time which spurred me on to complete a Masters degree in Dementia followed by a PhD researching the experiences of people with Down syndrome and dementia. So, whilst I have an academic interest in this area I am very much grounded in practice and in ensuring that information is made available in an accessible format.
My Great Aunt had Down syndrome and, unusually for the period in which she grew up, lived at home with family into her adult years. So it came as no surprise when research started showing the link between quality of life and increased life expectancy.

 

People with disabilities are living for longer and as a result we are seeing more people with intellectual disabilities than ever develop dementia as they age. What training is available for carers and professionals to help deal with this increase?Watchman Intellectual Disability and Dementia 9781849054225
Typically in the UK, staff, volunteers and carers supporting people with an intellectual disability do not have training in dementia. Similarly, staff supporting older people with dementia do not have training in intellectual disabilities, despite many younger people (especially with Down syndrome) being diagnosed, and some moved inappropriately to care homes for older people.
This is slowly starting to change but there is still not enough interdisciplinary exchange of learning. Training and courses that I deliver where staff attend from across sectors are very valuable, as participants learn from each other. However, it is not just intellectual disability or dementia services – equally important, especially as dementia progresses, is the input of all allied health and palliative professions and that there is partnership working with all services talking to each other and to carers, and all being consistent in their approach.

 

 

Are they any particular methods or activities which are helpful in explaining a dementia diagnosis to someone with an intellectual disability?
This is an area addressed in the book and is something that doesn’t receive enough attention currently. As a result there is inconsistency in practice. Information about a diagnosis or suspected diagnosis of dementia is not routinely shared with the person who has an intellectual disability, despite UK dementia strategies maintaining that everyone has a right to know of their diagnosis. We need to think more about how this can be done with people who have an intellectual disability and embrace non-verbal communication methods too.

 

 

What should staff or carers be aware of in order to be able to support people with an intellectual disability and dementia?
Someone who already works alongside people with an intellectual disability is likely to have been trained to support people to maximise their independence, to work towards independent living or community involvement to the best of their ability. Their work will be person centred and will be focused on the needs of each individual. There is an element or re-learning required by staff when the person with an intellectual disability has a diagnosis of dementia. The work should still be person centred and based around the individual but as capacity and cognitive ability change there is an associated need to change the way that staff, volunteers, family and friends provide support.
Carers also need information about interventions – this may or may not include medication. Social interventions such as meaningful activities and life story work are also essential. Awareness of contraindications with medication is important especially as many people with intellectual disabilities are over-prescribed anti-psychotic medication.
Specific knowledge of dementia that needs to be shared with staff, volunteers, family and friends include: what dementia is, different types of dementia and how each affects the person, early signs (this can differ from early signs in older people without an intellectual disability), environmental adaptation to ensure that accommodation is appropriate to the persons changing needs, communication changes and physical changes that will occur as the condition progresses. I am often asked for help with what is perceived as a behavioural issue, but with appropriate information or training there is a realisation that if we get the environment, communicating and our approach right – this is what has caused the changes in behaviour.  We need to work out the triggers and acknowledge our role in this – often a change in behaviour is caused by us not understanding the person and not providing appropriate support.

Intellectual Disability and Dementia is due to be published May 2014. 
Karen Watchman is the editor of the book as well as an experienced expert in working with intellectual disabilities.