Take a look at our new Pastoral Care and Special Educational Needs catalogue

Our education resources offer valuable guidance on important school issues such as mental health, special educational needs, autism, bullying and peer pressure, safeguarding, restorative justice, sex education, trauma and attachment, gender diversity and more.

If you would like to request a free print copy of the catalogue, please email hello@JKP.com.

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Join our Pastoral Care and SEN mailing list

teacher resourcesSign up to our mailing list to receive a free copy of our new Pastoral Care and Special Educational Needs catalogue.

Our resources offer valuable guidance on important school issues such as mental health, special educational needs, autism, bullying & peer pressure, safeguarding, restorative justice, sex education & more.

To request a free print copy of the JKP complete catalogue of books on Pastoral Care and Special Educational Needs, sign up to our mailing list below. Be sure to click any additional areas of interest so we can notify you by email about exciting new titles you might like.

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Kids and the computer screen – where do we draw the line?

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“I’m worried about my child’s technology use. Why does my son scream when I try to get him off the computer? Is my daughter honest about her Internet activities? Just how much screen time is too much? What effect is all of this technology having on my child’s learning and behavior?” Pg. 11, Digital Kids: How to Balance Screen Time and Why It Matters by Martin Kutscher

 

The average 8 year old child spends nearly 10 hours a day on digital media. This makes digital consumption second only to sleep as their leading activity. It’s not news to us that kids are using their digital devices all day, every day. But does this really matter? Many children receive digital devices as gifts but what are the risks of overusing them. Also what can parents do to combat this?

Digital Kids is the first book of its kind to lay out the facts and figures surrounding excessive internet use. Drawing on cutting edge research and expert scientific opinion, Martin Kutscher pinpoints exactly what effect digital addiction is having on our children’s brains and development – and the reasons why we should be worried about it.

Outlining the full range of neurological, psychological and physical implications, from stunted cognitive development and shortening attention spans, to depression, aggression and obesity, Digital Kids highlights the real dangers of too much screen time for the iPad generation.

This book is an eye-opening journey through the ins and outs of cyberspace, offering practical strategies on how to maintain a healthy screen-life balance. The internet, the smartphone and the digital TV are all here to stay, but it’s up to us where we draw the line.

 

Digital Kids: How to Balance Screen Time and Why It Matters by Martin Kutscher is now available in paperback from Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Teacher tips for supporting children with dyslexia – Diana Hudson

In this chapter taken from dyslexiaSpecific Learning Difficulties – What Teachers Need to Know, Diana Hudson gives practical advice to busy teachers who have a student with dyslexia. She provides simple but effective tips to improve their learning, organisation and memory processing skills, whilst describing indicators to help them spot a student who has not yet been diagnosed.

Click here to download the extract

Specific Learning Difficulties – What Teachers Need to Know is a straight-talking guide to supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties. It provides an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of students with commonly encountered SpLDs, such as Autism Spectrum Disorder, ADHD and OCD, and suggests ways of modifying teaching materials to make learning more enjoyable for them.

Diana Hudson is a tutor and mentor to students with SpLDs. She has been a subject classroom teacher (biology), a learning support teacher and a SENCO. She has a diagnosis of dyslexia and is a parent to four children, three of whom have been diagnosed with SpLDs.

Click here to find out more about Diana Hudson’s book.