How important is empathy within our care system?

Frightened

Bo Hejlskov Elvén is a Clinical Psychologist, and author of Frightened, Disturbed, Dangerous?, Disruptive, Stubborn, Out of Control?, Confused, Angry, Anxious? and Sulky, Rowdy, Rude?, based in Sweden. He is an independent consultant and lecturer on autism and challenging behaviour, and an accredited Studio III trainer. In 2009, he was awarded the Puzzle Piece of the Year prize by the Swedish Autism Society for his lecturing and counselling on challenging behaviour. 

Frightened, Disturbed, Dangerous? Those words are often used to describe people in psychiatric care. Historically, schizophrenia is one of our oldest diagnoses still in use. Our oldest diagnoses describe people whose behaviour was unpredictable and clearly different than that of other people. Today, we still see descriptions of people with psychiatric conditions described as disturbed and dangerous despite all the knowledge we have contradicting those descriptions. The words we use to describe people affect the way we think about them and our methods for working with them. If we believe that a person is dangerous, we will keep our distance and even react faster to the person’s behaviour. We are also more prone to react with force.

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Confused, Angry, Anxious? How to understand and tackle challenging behaviours in older people in care

challenging behaviours dementia

In this extract, the authors of Confused, Angry, Anxious? look at one of the many challenges healthcare professionals can face when working in older and dementia care. With an accessible and easy-to-read style, the authors offer advice on how to best handle challenging behaviours effectively, professionally and with confidence.

click here to read the free extract!

 

This book intends to create a link between person-centred care methods and what is described as the low arousal approach, a method which aims to manage challenging behaviours in a calm and positive manner to minimise conflict, stress and fear. With many examples of everyday challenges and how to deal with them, this book has the potential to change your (working) life.

 ‘It is not the people with dementia whose task should be to behave themselves, rather it is the caregivers whose task should be to create a context that allows these people’s everyday life to function’.

Click here to find out more about the book.

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