Request a free copy of the new Art Therapy catalogue

Art therapy cat coverSign up to request your free copy of our latest brochure of new and bestselling books on Art Therapy.

This includes information on our new and bestselling titles such as ‘Mindfulness and the Arts Therapies’ by Laury Rappaport and ‘Using Art Therapy with Diverse Populations’ by Paula Howie. This range includes practical books for professionals, manuals on how to incorporate creative approaches into practice as well as guides for individuals who are themselves affected.                                                                         

To receive a free copy of the catalogue, please sign up for our mailing list and we’ll get one out to you right away. You may also request multiple copies to share with friends, family, colleagues and clients–simply note how many copies you would like (up to 20) in the ‘any additional comments’ box on the sign-up form.

We hope you will take advantage of this opportunity to get more information about our outstanding new titles such as ‘Presence and Process in Expressive Arts Work’ by Herbert Eberhart. The catalogue also features information on bestselling titles such as ‘A Guide to Research Ethics for Art Therapists & Health Practitioners’ by Camilla Farrant and ‘The Expressive Arts Activity Book: A Resource for Professionals’ by Suzanne Darley.

Click this link to see a listing of new and recent titles from Jessica Kingsley Publishers’ Art Therapy list.

To request a copy of the JKP complete catalogue of books on Art Therapy, please click here to fill out our sign-up sheet. Please be sure to click any additional areas of interest as well. You should receive a copy of the catalogue within two weeks.

Mindful art-making with adolescents

anger imageIn this extract taken from Mindfulness and the Arts Therapies, edited by Laury Rappaport, Pat B. Allen introduces the way in which mindfulness is incorporated into the Open Studio Process, and describes the challenges and rewards of using this process with a group of adolescent boys. She explains her own reaction when the boys were invited to provide their own music for the art-making portion of a session, and how she found she could rely on the creative process as a positive form of support.

Read the extract here

 

Incorporating creativity in supervision

Chesner-Zografo_Creative-Superv_978-1-84905-316-7_colourjpg-print Anna Chesner, co-author of Creative Supervision Across Modalities, explains why using creativity in supervision sessions can benefit both the supervisor and supervisee, and gives her top tips for any therapist or helping professional new to using this approach.

Why is the use of creativity so effective in supervision sessions?
Creativity helps to link right brain and left brain understanding of practice. Often as practitioners we may have a feeling of stuckness, or going round in circles. Using creative methods helps us to facilitate new perspectives and fresh energy.

How can creative supervision ensure that a fresh perspective is maintained in supervision sessions, and how does this benefit the supervisor and supervisee?
Creative supervision can bring a new perspective and fresh energy to reflecting on our clinical or other professional practice. This in term can bring fresh energy and clarity to our sessions with clients. If supervision itself lacks vitality it may become part of the problem, rather than facilitating possible solutions.

In chapters 2 and 3 of your new book you write about the importance of roles in creative supervision – why is this? Which of the roles you mention do you think it is most difficult for a new supervisor to take on? Is there one that they tend to slip into more easily?
Not so much roles as an understanding of role (singular). The concept of role helps us to think about our “way of being” and our clients’ way of being. It is a practical tool for looking at patterns of behaviour and relating. Supervisor’s need an awareness of the multiple roles they may inhabit as a supervisor, and in the best case some role flexibility. Similarly, practitioners from all fields can benefit from thinking about their own roles in their practice, and indeed the roles of their clients within their various systems.

What is the most challenging thing you have to cover with trainee supervisors? What is it that they usually struggle most with in terms of incorporating creativity into sessions?
Supervision trainees have firstly to meet the challenge of getting to grips with the role of supervisor, which is distinct from their more familiar roles as clinician. There is an added challenge in learning how to use creative techniques in a way that is a spontaneous response to the supervisory question or focus and remains firmly within the frame of supervision.

Why is it that ‘irrational’ thinking can be such a crucial part of the creative process?
Not so much irrational as out of awareness, or known only implicitly. Face to face clinical work involves the practitioner in complex, multi-layered interactions, where physical or felt sense, and imagination are as important as the actual words spoken. Our right brain awareness can be brought to light particularly well through creative approaches to supervision.

You mention several times the importance of establishing a clear focus in the supervisory session – why is this?
A clear focus or supervisory question is helpful for a number of reasons. It ensures transparency about what kind of help or reflection opportunity is being sought. It supports a collaborative approach between supervisor and supervisee. It reveals the level at which a supervisee is able to reflect on and articulate their process.

What are the top tips you would give to a supervisor who is new to using creativity in their sessions?
– Reflect on your own interventions in the light of supervision theory
– Bring your creative supervision practice to your own supervision space
– Remain open to new learning
– Undertake training in the use of creative supervision methods

 

How well do you know yourself?

Bolton_Writers-Key_978-1-84905-475-1_colourjpg-webWe make assumptions about ourselves all the time, but how much do we really know?

As Gillie Bolton says in the opening chapter of her new book The Writer’s Key, ‘The simple action of putting words on a page can begin to help us find out what we think, believe and know’.

This exercise taken from the book is a great way to begin to explore ourselves through writing; our worries, our fears, our hopes, and our aspirations.

All you need to have a go is a pen and a piece of paper. You might be surprised by what you discover!

Download the free writing exercise here

 

 

Healing with body, movement and soul – a Q&A with Jill Hayes

Hayes_Soul-and-Spirit_978-1-84905-308-2_colourjpg-webIn this Q&A Jill Hayes, author of ‘Soul and Spirit in Dance Movement Psychotherapy’, explains why a transpersonal approach to Dance Movement Psychotherapy is so effective and shares her memories of a client whose work with soul and spirit allowed her to recover from addiction. 

 

How do you write about the connection between body, movement and soul?

I offer a particular perspective on the body and its movement as connected/joined to other living bodies and other living forms in nature. The body-self which feels and responds spontaneously and intuitively in relationship with other unique forms is given the name: soul. Soul is therefore the first response to being in the world as a separate living form. Sensitive and mobile, resonant and feeling, soul is born from the intelligent body, as a complete system.

Soul gets covered and becomes inactive/deadened by conventional, habitual response patterns. So to awaken movement from inside the body is to find a way back to soul: the creative core inside the living body.

 

What is it about the model of ego-soul-spirit that is so important in relation to DMP? How does it impact upon the bridges between them?

DMP makes bridges between ego, soul and spirit because all these aspects of self can becomes awake and conscious through moving bodies in the therapeutic relationship. DMP thrives on the premise of transitional space, constantly weaving connections between the felt-sense of life and the imaginings and thoughts about life. Articulating sensing, feeling, imagining and thinking is what DMP practitioners are trained to do.

Re-imagining and re-naming aspects of self as ego, soul and spirit provides vocabulary which can convey mysterious and sacred aspects of experience which are often neglected and sidelined in contemporary mental health practice. Recognising and asserting the conditions and the process through which mysterious healing occurs is important in re-conceiving and re-appraising potential methods for creating mental and physical wellness.

Mental health frameworks tend to favour observable, logical methods of practice. Sadly this cuts out a wealth of possibilities for healing. The invisible, the subtle, the energetic and ultimately the inexplicable need to be included in frameworks of wellness, for without them the palette of possibility dries up and is reduced to a few pale colours.

DMP awakens soul because it encourages participation of the whole body system in the process of change: it awakens the organs, the glands, the skin, the bones, the muscles, the fluids; it enlivens spirit through its attention to the flow of blood, the flow of breath and the flow of vibration through the living body, and it develops ego which listens to soul and spirit, inviting a mindful approach to appreciating and reflecting upon the felt sense of movement inside the body.

 

Describe the transpersonal approach to DMP and the experiential focus. Why is this so effective?

Transpersonal DMP is so effective because it contains a deep respect for a living process which happens despite the rational ego. It makes a place for the mysterious, inviting it to manifest in the therapeutic process. The welcoming of the mysterious brings new possibilities which cannot be thought by the rational ego, but can be imagined by the  psyche (a potential for imagining which is not limited by the experience of the ego) and felt in the soul body (which is joined to a living process uncapped by the separate self).

Transpersonal DMP invites the client to enter a creative flowing stream of potential growth and expansion through body, movement and imagination. Endlessly flowing and changing, movement and imagination create new pathways for the mover who trusts in the unknown and who can follow the call of unknown movement and unknown images.

Such transpersonal process is different to working with someone according to a rational theory. Theory often provides a rational pathway for the therapist to follow, offering a rational logic upon which to base interventions and to draft interpretations. Transpersonal practice rejects such assurances and puts its trust in an unfolding process which cannot be predicted, which offers riddles and confusions and surprises in equal measure.

In transpersonal practice the psychotherapist must give up looking for certainty and come home to uncertainty, to not knowing, to not being the expert, to being simply another vulnerable human being sharing an experience with the client. If both the therapist and the client can call up soul in the living body to provide clues to healthy living for the client, then that is enough. Entering into the experience of soul and spirit together is what makes the changes. It is effective because the creation of a flowing mobile relationship provides an axis of change. When both partners commit to being open to soul and spirit, a current of change is called into the process, inviting healing from the core of all life.

The Jungian vision of psyche as imaginal flow of change is present in this model: images pop up and startle the mover, guiding the moving body into relationship with patterns of balance and change, highlighting what is missing, what needs attention, what needs integration. Imagery is embodied and moved to expand the possibilities for growth and change.

 

How does the book explore soul and spirit?

The book explores soul and spirit both practically and theoretically, shaking the terms free from past cultural and religious contexts, but retaining their essential association with a sacred, mysterious movement of change. Case studies are used to illustrate the presence of soul and spirit in therapeutic practice. They exemplify how soul and spirit awaken a creative process of change.

 

Are there any cases of working with clients in this way that stick out in your mind? Why is this?

The case study of Lauren (Chapter 6) endures in my mind because she was able to work with soul and spirit to recover from addiction. In the containment of our joint commitment to her healing, Lauren was able to listen to her inner body (her soul) to understand that for growth and peace she needed to develop love and respect for her creative core.

First using images of psyche, which were strange, beautiful, frightening and unknown to her, Lauren moved and drew them to let them flourish and communicate, so that she became aware of the patterning of her extrovert self in the world, as well as aware of her inner potential, which lay frozen and unrealized inside.

Then through somatic practice, initially alone and then increasingly with me (intuitive tactile connection informed by many sources: Body Mind Centering, Authentic Movement, Cranio-Sacral Therapy, Mindfulness) Lauren delved deeper into her soul and deeper still to find spirit, realigning herself with spirit, listening to her need to connect fluidly, responsively, respectfully and truthfully with the world around her.

To move forward with integrity, Lauren needed to accept herself as she was. To accept herself as she was required the development of love, as joy felt in witnessing life in her own unique form. Without affirmation from an external source through touch, energetic resonance, parallel emotional sensing and imaginative empathy, it would have been hard for Lauren to love herself. A therapeutic relationship potentially provides a core relationship of growth which the client has perhaps never before experienced. This core relationship in which the client’s life and creativity is loved by the therapist, energizes the client’s commitment to her own life, so that she comes to appreciate that she has all she needs inside her to find her own way, because her body soul is sacred, it joins her to all life. She becomes capable of unraveling the past and unfolding the present trusting that the impetus from her core is a sacred impetus which will unfold her potential creatively and without distortion, so that she can become who she was intended to be; she understands that propelled by body and psyche, her blueprint will fulfill itself.

Creative therapists: How to be your own boss

Mikel_Art-of-Business_978-1-84905-950-3_colourjpg-webIn this extract from The Art of Business, author Emery Hurst Mikel takes a step-by-step look at the process of marketing yourself as a self-employed creative therapist, giving top hints and tips based on her own wealth of experience with this flexible way of working.

Read the extract here

 

Celebrating the stories of Sesame

Singing 'The Little Green Frog', led by Frankie Armstrong (standing), Jenny Pearson beside her.

Singing ‘The Little Green Frog’, led by Frankie Armstrong (standing), Jenny Pearson beside her.

JKP was delighted to attend the launch of Dramatherapy with Myth and Fairy-tale: The Golden Stories of Sesame by Jenny Pearson, Mary Smail and Pat Watts at Central School of Speech and Drama in North London on Saturday 15th June.

The launch was crowded with the authors’ colleagues, former students, friends and family, all keen to celebrate this exceptional book – among them Alida Gersie, who wrote the foreword, and JKP author, Sue Jennings. Jenny Pearson and Mary Smail regaled their audience with anecdotes of myth and fairytale in action, as well as reminiscences of Sesame days past. We were treated to two a cappella myth-based songs by Frankie Armstrong, world renowned singer and Voice Workshop leader, who also opened the occasion with a rendition of the warm-up song, ‘The Little Green Frog’ (with help from Jenny’s young grandson, Dylan).

The event was preceded by ‘Pat Fest’ – a tribute to Pat Watts, one of the authors, who unfortunately did not get to see the finished book, but who was responsible for committing her share of the stories to paper (originally on scraps of paper and envelope backs, as her co-authors revealed at the launch!). As a key figure in the history of the Sesame course and the creator of its first Myth element, many people came to rejoice in Pat’s remarkable work and legacy, and she was honoured with an enactment of ‘The Flowering Tree’ facilitated by Jeni Treves and Alison Kelly, coordinators on the Creative Arts supervision training course (CAST).

It was a hugely enjoyable evening and a wonderful way to celebrate this special book.

Below are a selection of pictures from the event:

Frankie Armstrong sings a ballad.

Frankie Armstrong sings a ballad.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jenny Pearson sining the book. In the background, picture of Pat Watts (the third author who sadly died while the book was being written) and three of her paintings.

Jenny Pearson signing the book. In the background, picture of Pat Watts and three of her paintings.

Mary Smail reading from the book. Next to her, Frankie Armstrong and Jenny Pearson, with her grandson Dylan on her knee.

Mary Smail reading from the book. Next to her, Frankie Armstrong and Jenny Pearson, with her grandson Dylan on her knee.

Mary Smail speaking to the crowd, with Jenny Pearson behind her.

Mary Smail speaking to the crowd, with Jenny Pearson behind her.

'Forever Mountain', a story from the book, told by Jenny Pearson, with Frankie Armstrong seated on her left

‘Forever Mountain’, a story from the book, told by Jenny Pearson, with Frankie Armstrong seated on her left.

Entering into the realm of imagination – an extract from Dramatherapy with Myth and Fairytale

Pearson-Smail-W_Dramatherapy-wi_978-1-84905-030-2_colourjpg-web Jenny Pearson, co-author of ‘Dramatherapy with Myth and Fairytale’, explains how this extract, from one of the chapters written by the late Pat Watts, expertly guides the reader through the process of preparing groups to enter into the realms of imagination, ready to begin a myth enactment.

“The myths and fairytales in this book are stories from long ago that have survived the centuries because they have been loved and because they carry wisdom and healing. They have survived because people have told them to their children and grandchildren who have remembered them, written them down, created books and plays, dances and films around them, and told them to their children.

In the drama and movement therapy practiced by the authors of this book, the stories take the form of simple, straightforward scripts. The opening chapters take the reader through the experience of entering into the stories as improvised drama and living them in role. The Sesame approach to myth enactment requires no previous experience of ‘acting’ or ‘dance’. Participants are invited into a given space and taken, step by step, toward and over the threshold that leads into the realm of imagination.

This is how Pat Watts, who created the Myth module of the Sesame training at Central School of Speech and Drama, describes the process of entry into that magical Land.”

Read the extract here

 

The comfort of music at the end of life – an extract from Musical Encounters with Dying

Runningdeer_Musical-Encount_978-1-84905-936-7_colourjpg-webWhile teaching piano to an adult student, an unexpected diagnosis led Islene Runningdeer to explore how music could provide a deep sense of comfort and support at the end of life.

Read more about the story here

This extract is taken from Musical Encounters with Dying, in which Islene Runningdeer shares many moving and inspirational tales about her work with patients facing death. This supportive guide considers the key ingredients for bringing music into palliative care settings such as creating a therapeutic relationship, helping patients to reach final goals, showing sensitivity to cultural contexts, and dealing with difficult emotions.