An interview with Debbie Garvey, early years education expert

Debbie Garvey

Hi Debbie, thank you for agreeing to answer some questions about your new book, and indeed on your growing collection of early years titles! What can readers expect from Nurturing Personal, Social and Emotional Development in Early Childhood and how does it differ from your previous work?

Well, I suppose the first major difference is that this book is about children, whereas the other books are about staff. This was always the book I wanted to write, it just took a little time to come to fruition, and I am so glad it did. The time in between first thinking about the PSED book, and starting to write it, meant time to develop ideas, read more research and really plan what themes I wanted to explore.

Another difference is perhaps that this book is a little more controversial as Dr Suzanne Zeedyk warns in the foreword, “It’s going to be a bit of a bumpy ride.” I didn’t set out to be controversial – I simply hope that practitioners will maybe think about things in a slightly different way. So, for example, I’ve asked readers to consider how we approach Christmas, Graduations and behaviours, and imagine being a young child in those situations. Often, putting ourselves in a young child’s shoes  allows us to see things in a very different way.

Who would you say your books would be most useful for, and what have you done to maximise their practicality? Continue reading

Nurturing Personal, Social and Emotional Development in Early Childhood

PSED

Read on for an extract from Debbie Garvey’s new book for Early Years professionals

Nurturing Personal, Social and Emotional Development in Early Childhood by Debbie Garvey is a practical and direct guide that supports practitioners in nurturing personal, social and emotional development (PSED) in young children by demystifying brain development research.

Condensing a wealth of recent research and theory around PSED into practical guidance, it gives professionals the knowledge and understanding they need to critically evaluate their own practice and find the best course of action to support PSED in young children. From the perspective of neuroscience, it explores what can help or hinder development, considers why some children bite and why toddlers have tantrums, and questions how well-intentioned actions, such as reward systems or putting new foods on a plate for children to ‘just try’, may be misguided.

Click here to read an extract from Chapter 1: ‘Brain Development, Neuroscience and PSED’


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Read an extract from Sophie Ashton’s The Secrets of Successful Adoptive Parenting

Ashton_Secrets-of-Succ_978-1-78592-078-3_colourjpg-printIn this extract from The Secrets of Successful Adoptive Parenting, Sophie Ashton discusses how it is perfectly normal to feel emotionally overwhelmed soon after your child moves in, how the process of successfully integrating them into your family does not simply happen overnight, but that in the long term adopting can be a wholly rewarding experience that brings joy, hope and fulfillment. An honest and reassuring account of what it can really be like to be an adoptive parent, The Secrets of Successful Adoptive Parenting is a practical hands-on guide that will help you prepare for the highs and lows of being an adoptive parent. It discusses preparing for the journey ahead, parenting with empathy, facilitating your child’s attachment, helping your child feel listened to, and providing structure and consistency in order to successfully integrate your child into your family life.

>>Click here to download the extract<<

The emotional and behavioural challenges of adoptive parenting – Sophie Ashton

Ashton_Secrets-of-Succ_978-1-78592-078-3_colourjpg-printIn this article Sophie Ashton, author of The Secrets of Successful Adoptive Parenting, talks reassuringly about the emotional challenges of adopting a child.

It is quite common for adopters to feel emotionally overwhelmed soon after their child moves in

In the early weeks post-placement many adopters feel a mix of emotions in response to their child.  For some adoptive parents the challenging and negative emotions seem more prevalent than the positive ones, and can on occasion lead to them starting to question their reasons for wanting to adopt.  Sometimes these challenging emotions can put the adoption placement at risk of breaking down.  I know this – because it almost happened to us.

After four years in the adoption process we were very ready for the arrival of our daughter. Although emotionally exhausting, the eight-day introduction period went well.  We warmed to her – she warmed to us; she and our birth son seemed to get on well.  We were all beyond excited when she moved in – we adored her.  Happy days!  Our dream of a perfect family was coming true!

Our honeymoon period didn’t last long

Unbeknown to us, however, just the other side of a brief two-day honeymoon period were some pretty challenging and debilitating emotions lying in wait for us to experience in full.  These emotions turned our excitement into panic, our hope into despair and our happiness into gloom.  We felt heavy and weighed down by the mixed emotions we felt in response to the placement of this little girl in to our family.

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