Fun activities to help primary school children with SEN improve their reading and writing


SEN English lessonsAge range:

Ages 3 – 11

Description: 

A collection of fun and engaging learning activities to help primary school children with SEN to improve their reading and writing in an inclusive classroom. Each lesson is tailored to objectives for children working below National Curriculum levels and includes a learning objective, the resources needed, the main activity, a plenary activity and a consolidation activity to help support children’s understanding.

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These lesson plans are taken from Kate Bradley and Claire Brewer’s new learning resource, 101 Inclusive and SEN English Lessons: Fun Activities and Lesson Plans for Children Aged 3 – 11. They have also authored 101 Inclusive and SEN Maths Lessons.

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Why don’t we listen to the true experts on dyslexia?

In more than 100 interviews around the the world with 8-18-year-olds with dyslexia, Margaret Rooke has put together the first book of its kind; a book about young people with dyslexia, told by the young people themselves. Whilst they acknowledge that dyslexia can sometimes be a struggle, they also talk about the great strengths their dyslexia has given them, such as creativity, determination, empathy and grit. Take a look at some of the interviews here.

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Take a look inside The Illustrated Guide to Dyslexia and Its Amazing People

illustrated guide dyslexiaFilled with gentle humour and colourful imagery, The Illustrated Guide to Dyslexia and Its Amazing People uses visual content to bring dyslexia to life. Suitable for all age groups, this Guardian Bookshop and Amazon bestseller explains what dyslexia means, how it feels, what to do about it, and how to learn to embrace it.

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I don’t like reading!

dyslexiaLisabeth Emlyn Clark talks about her experience of growing up with dyslexia and how she wishes she’d received the correct support at a younger age to help her manage it.  Her personal story has inspired her to write a children’s book about a boy named Harry with dyslexia called I Don’t Like Reading.

As a child I loved looking at books and enjoyed having them read to me. Often with my favourite stories I would stare at the pages for an age, looking at every part of the picture so I could memorize the details while I listened to the words being spoken. When the pages were turned I would look at the picture and hear the first few words, and could finish the sentence before the reader did.

I remember being around 6 or 7 years old when I started to realise that my friends and class mates seemed to finish reading their books so much faster than I did. They all seemed to be on the harder stage books than me and some even on the ‘pupil choice’ stage. I left primary school having never been able to choose my own reading book!

It’s not that I couldn’t read then, or can’t read now; my issue has always been that I try so hard to read the text that it becomes harder to remember what I have just read and this makes books difficult to understand. Continue reading

Take a look at our new Pastoral Care and Special Educational Needs catalogue

Our education resources offer valuable guidance on important school issues such as mental health, special educational needs, autism, bullying and peer pressure, safeguarding, restorative justice, sex education, trauma and attachment, gender diversity and more.

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Join our Pastoral Care and SEN mailing list

teacher resourcesSign up to our mailing list to receive a free copy of our new Pastoral Care and Special Educational Needs catalogue.

Our resources offer valuable guidance on important school issues such as mental health, special educational needs, autism, bullying & peer pressure, safeguarding, restorative justice, sex education & more.

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What is the science behind being creative and why are people with dyslexia so good at it?

Dyslexia CreativityMargaret Malpas, author of Self-fulfilment with Dyslexia, provides an overview of the creative process in a person’s brain and explores the reasons why creativity is a particular strength of people with dyslexia.

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Her book, printed on cream paper so that it is easy on the eye, is a very simple to follow guide designed to help people with dyslexia make the most of their true potential. Royalties from the sale of the book will be donated to the British Dyslexia Association. Find out more about the book here.

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With dyslexia comes the determination to succeed – Margaret Malpas

dyslexiaMargaret Malpas, author of Self-fulfilment with Dyslexia, explains how it is not just talent that makes people successful but rather the strength of character to succeed. Admitting that dyslexic people may well struggle academically at an early age, she nonetheless asserts that with dyslexia comes the determination to prove your critics wrong.

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‘It’s not fair mum! You’ve bought more Christmas presents for him than me!’

Christmas presents SpLDVeronica Bidwell, author of The Parents’ Guide to Specific Learning Difficulties, discusses the importance of treating your children equally during Christmas. Admitting that children with specific learning difficulties tend to receive more attention than their siblings from their parents throughout the year, she reflects that Christmas should be used as a time to bridge rather than expose these gaps.

As we come up to Christmas I find myself thinking about ‘fairness’.  Am I being fair in the way I plan presents for children and grandchildren?  Is fairness to do with value, with what they want or with what they need at this particular time?  Is a scooter equal to a pair of pyjamas or a boxed set of CS Lewis’s Narnia books?

Children develop a keen sense of fairness and justice at quite an early age.  I think most of us can remember the indignation and hurt if things within the family didn’t seem fair.  Why did my little sister always seem to get away with things for which I would be told off?

There are things children want and there are things children need. All of them need love, time and attention from the important adults in their lives.  They need support, guidance and discipline.  They may need help with homework, in preparing for exams, in mastering a new skill.  Help may entail time, attention and resources. Continue reading