How to develop positive thinking in young people with autism by using Social Stories ™

” What Einstein was to atomic theory, astronomy, and math,
Siobhan Timmins is to Social Stories™ “
Carol Gray (founder and creator of Social Stories™)

 

Using the highly effective Social Stories™ model, Developing Resilience in Young People with Autism using Social Stories™ is full of ideas for coping with negative experiences and helping young people with autism, who are particularly susceptible to setbacks. In the following extract Siobhan Timmins introduces how to build positive thinking and then presents two Social Stories™ from her book called
Beginning to think in a positive way and Learning to think in a positive way.

 

Click the link below to read the extract

 

READ THE EXTRACT 

 

Rather not miss an extract or article like this one? Discover all the latest news, offers, events and articles on our autism and related conditions books by joining our mailing list. We can send information by email or post as you prefer and you can unsubscribe at any time.

 

 

5 things about conversation that everyone on the autism spectrum should know


Starting a conversation and then maintaining one can be difficult for teenagers and young adults on the autism spectrum. In the following blog Paul Jordan, the author of  How to start, carry on and end conversations: Scripts for social situations for people on the autism spectrum offers up advice on making sense of everyday social situations and gives us 5 top tips on maintaining a good conversation with someone.

  • Maintain eye contact with the other person
    This is extremely important for successful conversations, especially with neurotypicals (people without autism). This is arguably because, their brains which are wired conventionally, tell them that you are giving them your attention when you are looking at them.  Continue reading

My child has autism and has started smearing… what can I do?

 

In this blog Kate Reynolds, the author of What to do About Smearing, addresses the issue of smearing and what parents and carers of children with autism can do when they are confronted with this type of behaviour.    Continue reading

Tony Attwood on autism – how our understanding and approach has developed over the last 30 years

To mark JKP’s 30th anniversary year Tony Attwood has written about JKP’s role in developing the world’s understanding of and approach to autism. In this article he also touches upon his own experiences as a clinical psychologist/author, and what he thinks will be the key areas of discovery in the future.  Continue reading

Sex and Relationships – read an extract from Sex, Drugs and Asperger’s Syndrome by Luke Jackson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read an extract from the chapter on sex and relationships in Luke Jackson’s new book, Sex, Drugs and Asperger’s Syndrome: A User Guide to Adulthood

The 13 year old author of the bestselling Freaks, Geeks and Asperger Syndrome, Luke Jackson is all grown up, and in his own words –

“[I’ve] literally had a lifetime of experience since then, and to read back through what I wrote at that time renders me incredulous – I was a different person.
Since then, I have struggled with a myriad of issues, been through the darkest of times, come through the highest of highs and the lowest of lows, but the point is, I’m still here.”

 

With his follow up Sex, Drugs and Asperger’s Syndrome (now available in paperback) Luke tackles all of the difficult subjects that a young person on the autism spectrum is likely to face as they mature into adulthood. In the following extract Luke offers no-nonsense brotherly advice about dating drawn from his own experiences as well as those of his friends, all shot through with a healthy dose of candid humour.

You can read the extract taken from the chapter Sex and Relationships by CLICKING HERE

 

 

Buy Sex, Drugs and Asperger’s Syndrome: A User Guide to Adulthood in paperback from Jessica Kingsley Publishers here

Coping with anxiety at Christmas if you are on the autism spectrum

The author of bridge-bridge_autism-anxiety_978-1-78592-077-6_colourjpg-printAutism, Anxiety and Me: A Diary in Even Numbers, Emma Louise Bridge, offers advice for those with autism on how best to cope with anxiety at Christmas time.

 

The shopping, the crowds, the parties, and the art of present giving… it is easy not to feel quite so wonderful at this most wonderful time of year. However as much as Christmas is one of those times of year that is just unavoidably stressful, it doesn’t mean you can’t plan ways to survive the holidays. At best you can have lots of fun, and at worst, well you can at least make it through.

The first step in holiday survival is planning. I personally like to do this with lists; even-numbered of course. Even if you’re not hosting the in-laws or planning a party, you will be surprised how much at Christmas can be thought out beforehand to save zig-zags in blood pressure. To provide a more in-depth example let’s take present-giving; something that I find far more stressful at Christmas than any other time because it is reciprocal. So, first plan out the details.

  • Who do you have to buy for?
  • Who will probably be buying for you?
  • What is your budget?
  • What you are going to buy?

Now I love surprises but at the same time I don’t, mostly because the need to make sure that all my gifts are either of an equal monetary or emotional value as those given to me is too great. The easiest way to ease this stress is to introduce wish lists. Ask everyone what they want. If you want to choose something then ask them for a list of different options. On the same principle you can produce a list yourself. Even if no-one asks, produce a list of things you really want and just offer it as a suggestion. Even if other people weren’t expecting it hopefully they will respect it as a way to make Christmas a little easier – after all everyone should be able to have fun.

Other lists can include:

  • Anything you need like decorations or advent calendar
  • Any parties you are invited to / hosting
  • Who is coming or where you’re going over the holidays
  • Any events such as carols or services that are going on
  • Food you need to buy


Planning, planning and more planning!!!

The second step to surviving the holidays is the guide to surviving parties. Christmas parties generally involve a lot of food, a bunch of being social and loud super cheerful music. So first things first: know you’re going to eat more over Christmas. It just seems to be inevitable, so plan ahead for that. Also if you know you’re going to go to a party where you might not be able to eat anything – because your entire family are on special diets – but you’re going to be super hungry because there is food everywhere… putting something in your handbag or pocket for emergencies is a seasonal must.

The other thing that stresses me out at parties is the number of people who are going to ask how life is going, what my plans for the New Year are, how my job is, how much I have grown etc. Now the answer to some of those questions never changes – ‘nope, still the same height’ / ‘yes it has been years’ / ‘happy Christmas to you too’ – but there are some conversations where stock phrases won’t do. This can be tough especially if your life isn’t necessarily where you want it to be or you don’t have much to talk about. The answer is simple and something I have learned over the years of trying to master the art of surviving in society. People love to talk about themselves, so bring the conversation back around to them every time you feel uncomfortable and you’re on to a winner. Even better, join a group where there are a couple of people who love to talk and happily be a background listener for as long as you can get away with it.

Also keep in mind that you’re bound to not be the only person in the room who isn’t exactly where they want to be at that point. Doesn’t mean you won’t ever be.

So my final surviving the holidays tip is this – don’t be worried about asking for help. It’s okay to not feel brilliant even if the world is covered in Christmas cheer. It is okay if it is hard or emotional. There could be a hundred reasons why. I know it is really easy to feel you have to shove a smile on your face and fake it ‘til you make it. And sometimes trying to tough it out is the right decision. But sometimes you just have to sit down and admit to yourself, or to someone you trust, that you could use some help. Or even just that you could do with being cut some slack. Don’t compare yourself to anyone else… you survive the holidays the best way you know how.

In conclusion:

  • Lists are awesome
  • Parties are survivable – just go in prepared
  • Survive Christmas the best way you know how – don’t let anyone tell you how you have to be

 

Did you like this blog? If so why not sign up to the JKP mailing list to get updates on all our autism-related books such as Autism, Anxiety and Me: A Diary in Even Numbers by Emma Louise Bridge as well as special offers and additional content.
Click HERE to sign up today

New autism books catalogue for winter 2016/17

You can now browse through the 2016/2017 new and bestselling books catalogue for autism.

Featuring exciting new titles arriving in 2017 from Luke Jackson, Kathy Hoopmann, Bo Hejlskov Elven, Wenn Lawson the new JKP autism catalogue also includes some of the bestselling titles of recent years from authors such as Tony Attwood, Carol Gray, Rudy Simone, Jennifer Cook O’Toole and many more. There are new books on Social StoriesTM , Lego-Based therapy, mental health, sexuality, women and girls, anxiety and related conditions for all ages.

If you see anything in the catalogue that interests you please visit www.jkp.com for additional information.

The girls with autism and their new young adult novel

girls with autismYou can now read the opening chapter of M in the Middle:  Secret Crushes, Mega-Colossal Anxiety and the People’s Republic of Autismthe new book from the Girls of Limpsfield Grange School and Vicky Martin.

Life after diagnosis isn’t easy for M or her friends and family  too. Faced with an exciting crush, a pushy friend and an unhelpful Headteacher, how long until the beast of anxiety pounces again?

CLICK HERE for Part 1 M’s World – Chapter 1

 

If you enjoyed this extract sign up to the JKP mailing list for more info about our books, exclusive chapter previews and offers.
http://www.jkp.com/mailing

 

M in the Middle:  Secret Crushes, Mega-Colossal Anxiety and the People’s Republic of Autism is available now from Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Teacher Tips for Supporting Children with SEN and Autism

Devine_Flying-Starts-f_978-1-78592-001-1_colourjpg-print

Adele Devine reflects upon her new book Flying Starts for Unique Children and offers practical advice on making sure that children with Autism and SEN get off to the best start at school.   

Imagine that you are about to start a new job, but you know nothing about it. You do not know where it will be, who you will be working with, what the expectations will be or how long the day will last. How would this make you feel – nervous, resistant or even fearful?

Starting school

When children start school they enter the great unknown. There are those who will transition without issue. These children slot in, they see toys, play, interact, make friends and meet expected milestones.

Then there is the child who arrives filled with fear. They find the sounds painful, the smells intolerable, the environment overwhelming and the other children exhaustingly unpredictable. Maybe this child has autism.  Maybe this child has an undiagnosed, invisible disability

There are simple accommodations that can make the world of difference to the first impressions of a child with Special Educational Needs. These things should be in place in every pre school and reception class before the children start school. First impressions are important. There are no second chances. If we do not get it right from the start the child will remember. They may decide that they do not like school. They may resist, they may refuse or worse still they may start to withdraw.

Continue reading

Why does someone with Asperger’s syndrome become depressed? Read the first chapter from Tony Attwood & Michelle Garnett’s new book

Attwood-Garnett_Exploring-Depre_978-1-84905-502-4_colourjpg-printPeople with Asperger’s syndrome are at greater risk of becoming depressed for a number of reasons that leave them with a tendency to isolate themselves. In the opening chapter of Tony Attwood and Michelle Garnett’s new book Exploring Depression and Beating the Blues: A CBT Self-Help Guide to Understanding and Coping with Depression in Asperger’s Syndrome [ASD-Level 1] the authors explore these reasons and introduce their self-help programme for dealing with the issues that might lead someone with Asperger’s syndrome to experience feelings of depression.

Drawing on the latest thinking and research Attwood & Garnett use Cognitive Behavioural Therapy methods designed specifically for individuals with Asperger’s syndrome (ASD-level 1) to help increase self-awareness, identify personal triggers, and provide all the tools needed to combat depression and suicidal thought.

You can read the first chapter from Exploring Depression and Beating the Blues: A CBT Self-Help Guide to Understanding and Coping with Depression in Asperger’s Syndrome [ASD-Level 1] simply by clicking on the link below.


Chapter 1: Why Does Someone With Asperger’s Syndrome Become Depressed? CLICK HERE TO READ  

Continue reading