No matter how young the child, honesty is the best way…


That is according to Nathalie Slosse, author of Big Tree is Sick, who tells the story of how the book came to be, as well as laying out her case for complete honesty as the best way to engage with children when helping them to understand serious illness.

In surveys on what values ​​we consider important, honesty is always highly rated, usually even as the most important quality. However, when it comes to honestly confiding something serious to our children, we often want to spare them the grief that the harsh truth can bring. It is a dilemma I struggled with when I was treated for breast cancer, and it’s why I want to provide a resource to others in the same situation today.

Sometimes people ask me “Did breast cancer change your way of life?” I wish I could reply that this was not the case; it’s true that prior to my diagnosis I followed my heart when it came to important life choices. But if I’m honest, I must admit that without the painful episode in 2007, I would not be doing what I do now. The battle I had with breast cancer as a mum of a two year old boy helped me discover that I can help people find happiness in difficult circumstances. In 2010 I founded the association Talismanneke to further explore that path.

But let’s start at the beginning.

Continue reading

‘Writing this book took me on an extraordinary journey’ – we talk to Declan Henry about writing ‘Trans Voices’

Declan Henry is a creative non-fiction writer and a registered social worker. He is also gay, and was ashamed of how little he knew about the T in LGBT, despite being considered part of this community. We asked him what he learned from writing about the experiences of trans and non-binary people for his new book, ‘Trans Voices.’

Why did you feel that there was a need for a book that presents the real experiences of transgender and non-binary people?

Up until two years ago, I’d never met a transgender person – or certainly not knowingly so. I wanted to explore why somebody would be so unhappy about their gender that they would seek to change it. I wanted to speak with transgender people and hear their stories. I wanted to demystify the wrongful image that the media has portrayed of some people having ‘sex change’ operations on a whim.  Writing this book took me on an extraordinary journey. I travelled all over the UK and Ireland to interview trans people and listened first-hand to their life experiences.

The book covers four different groups of people; trans women, trans men, non-binary people and those who cross-dress. Why did you choose to speak to these 4 groups in particular?

Because those are the four main categories under the wider trans umbrella. Although cross-dressers are not transgender they form part of the trans community. They are completely satisfied with their gender, and are mainly heterosexual men who enjoy dressing in female clothes for relaxation and enjoyment. But it was important to include them because they are often confused with trans women and vice versa. Whilst cross dressers and trans women share some brief similarities, overall there is a distinct difference between both groups.

You interviewed over 100 different people for the book – were there any stories that particularly surprised you? Or that have stayed with you?

I remarked on the bravery of all the people I interviewed and learned so much from each person. The age group of my interviewees included a 19 year old trans man in Dublin to a 79 year old trans women in Bedfordshire. It was interesting to see how easier it is becoming to ‘come out’ and transition to the opposite gender these days, in comparison to how difficult it was twenty, thirty or forty years ago. From those I interviewed I was also able to demystify societal myths about trans people, including the misconception that being trans is a lifestyle choice, that trans people are really gay people dressed up as women/men, that trans people are confused and it’s a phase they are going through, that all they are interested in is sex or that they are mentally ill. Clearly, none of these are true.

How did you go about reaching out to the many people who contributed to the book?

I contacted transgender support groups in the UK and Ireland outlining my book proposal. I explained that I wanted to write a book to raise greater understanding and awareness of what it meant to be trans in today’s world, and in the process, I would challenge the misconceptions that people have about trans people. I asked questions about their childhood, transitioning process, reassignment surgery, social networks and lifestyle, emotional health, sexuality and discrimination. They liked my approach to the subject and showed great appreciation that somebody who was not trans had taken the time to write about such an important issue.

The book is essentially an introduction to trans and non-binary issues, so along with first person perspectives, you cover a range of subjects that affect these communities like mental health, transphobia and sexuality. Some of the accounts of transphobia are particularly saddening. Did you feel as though most people you spoke to were keen to share their experiences with you?

Sadly, transphobia is still very prevalent in society. Nearly of all the trans people I interviewed were able to recall incidents where they encountered name calling, staring and sniggering at some point in their lives – to more serious matters of physical assaults, threats and harassment.  Simply, it would seem that there are always going to be people who go out of their way to be unpleasant to those who are ‘different’ because of their own fear and ignorance– but I hope this will improve with greater trans awareness and visibility. Also it is worth noting that there are fewer trans people murdered in the UK and Europe that in places like America or Asia.  Trans Remembrance Day is on the 20th November each year, where trans people who have been murdered are remembered in special services amongst the trans community.

You open the book with the statement ‘As a gay man, I decided to write this book because I was ashamed of how little I knew about trans people.’  Would you agree that people often assume that gay and trans people face the same challenges? (Perhaps because of the label given to both communities – LGBT.)

Absolutely, up until a few years ago I knew very little about trans people and now I consider myself a bit of an expert thanks to the many wonderful people I met whilst writing the book who graciously shared their stories and experiences with me for the book. It was this way that I discovered that gay people do not have to endure the same difficulties as trans people. Coming out as trans results in a complete identity change along with lifelong hormone treatment and sometimes multiple surgeries to bring the new gender into physical reassignment. I’m not saying gay people don’t face rejection and homophobia in society but trans people, more often, face greater intolerance through transphobia.

It seems as though trans men and non-binary people are still very much underrepresented in our culture and in the media, whereas trans women have experienced more visibility recently – probably due to high-profile trans women in the public eye, such as Laverne Cox and Caitlyn Jenner. Did you notice such an imbalance when speaking to trans and non-binary people for Trans Voices?

Historically, trans men have come out as trans earlier in life than trans women, although up until the last couple of years there were fewer trans men than trans women. That is changing, however, with recent statistics indicating that these days there are as many trans men as trans women transitioning. Non-binary people are also coming more to the forefront of the trans community. But generally this category consists of younger trans people who do not identify as either men or women, depending on their gender assigned at birth, or those who consider they are both genders. There are more than 20 non-binary terms/descriptions in this category to help explain gender internalisation and how this dictates the way the person presents to the world. It is noted though that there is a steady increase too in the number of people identifying as non-binary in recent years.

What do you hope readers will take away from the book?

This book is really for everybody, whether they are part of the LGBT community or they have somebody close to them who is trans. The book also serves as a guidebook for professionals working with the trans community. It’s written with the intention of imparting greater awareness and tolerance towards trans people who are becoming more prevalent and visible in society. Any person with an interest in trans people – either personal or professional – will be able to pick up this book and gain a deeper understanding of trans issues. My book educates and informs people about transgender issues, ranging from trans people who haven’t come out yet, to family and friends of trans people who want a greater understanding of the subject. Currently, the majority of people haven’t encountered a transgender person but this will change in the years to come because more and more people are coming out as trans than ever before – and some are coming out early in their teenage years.

Trans Voices is available to buy online.

For more news and exclusive content from our authors, check out our Facebook page – JKPGenderDiversity.

Sex and Relationships – read an extract from Sex, Drugs and Asperger’s Syndrome by Luke Jackson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read an extract from the chapter on sex and relationships in Luke Jackson’s new book, Sex, Drugs and Asperger’s Syndrome: A User Guide to Adulthood

The 13 year old author of the bestselling Freaks, Geeks and Asperger Syndrome, Luke Jackson is all grown up, and in his own words –

“[I’ve] literally had a lifetime of experience since then, and to read back through what I wrote at that time renders me incredulous – I was a different person.
Since then, I have struggled with a myriad of issues, been through the darkest of times, come through the highest of highs and the lowest of lows, but the point is, I’m still here.”

 

With his follow up Sex, Drugs and Asperger’s Syndrome (now available in paperback) Luke tackles all of the difficult subjects that a young person on the autism spectrum is likely to face as they mature into adulthood. In the following extract Luke offers no-nonsense brotherly advice about dating drawn from his own experiences as well as those of his friends, all shot through with a healthy dose of candid humour.

You can read the extract taken from the chapter Sex and Relationships by CLICKING HERE

 

 

Sex, Drugs and Asperger’s Syndrome: A User Guide to Adulthood is now available in paperback from Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
Freaks, Geeks and Asperger Syndrome: A User Guide to Adolescence is also available in paperback from Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Confused, Angry, Anxious? How to understand and tackle challenging behaviours in older people in care

challenging behaviours dementia

In this extract, the authors of Confused, Angry, Anxious? look at one of the many challenges healthcare professionals can face when working in older and dementia care. With an accessible and easy-to-read style, the authors offer advice on how to best handle challenging behaviours effectively, professionally and with confidence.

click here to read the free extract!

 

This book intends to create a link between person-centred care methods and what is described as the low arousal approach, a method which aims to manage challenging behaviours in a calm and positive manner to minimise conflict, stress and fear. With many examples of everyday challenges and how to deal with them, this book has the potential to change your (working) life.

 ‘It is not the people with dementia whose task should be to behave themselves, rather it is the caregivers whose task should be to create a context that allows these people’s everyday life to function’.

Click here to find out more about the book.

If you would like to read more articles like this and hear the latest news and offers on our Dementia books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer, and please also tell us about your areas of interest so we can send the most relevant information. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Exclusive: Read an extract from ‘Trans Voices’

Read an extract from the first chapter of Declan Henry’s new book about transgender and non-binary experiences, here.

‘Declan Henry starts the book with a refreshingly honest confession that at one point he knew very little about the T in LGBT. With complete earnestness he sets out to give an overview of the transgender community in simple and very readable sections. He has packed this small book full of information, snippets of enlightening interviews and his thoughts about transgender equality and equality in its widest sense. A must read for anyone wishing to be an ally who realises that only with knowledge and understanding can you change hearts and minds.’
– Juno Roche, Writer, campaigner and Patron of cliniQ

For more information on the book, and to buy your own copy, please follow this link.

Disruptive, stubborn, out of control? How can we tackle challenging behaviour in schools?

disruptive behaviourIn this extract from Disruptive, Stubborn, Out of Control?, Clinical Psychologist Bo Hejlskov Elvén looks at the psychology behind children’s behaviour and offers fresh advice to teachers on how to handle confrontation in the classroom. Referring to his method as the low arousal approach, he puts forward that it is best not to rise to the bait, but to act moderately in order to restore harmony and gain the student’s trust.

Click here to download the extract

With many examples of typical confrontational behaviours and clues for how to understand and resolve the underlying issues, his book provides an innovative approach to restructuring the teacher-student relationship. Click here to find out more about the book.

If you would like to read more articles like Bo’s and hear the latest news and offers on our Education books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer, and please also tell us about your areas of interest so we can send the most relevant information. You can unsubscribe at any time.

“We simply cannot afford to be complacent.” Fiyaz Mughal on why we need a book that presents the true nature of Islam

On the publication of ‘Muslim Identity in a Turbulent Age’, we spoke to one of the book’s editors, Fiyaz Mughal. Fiyaz is also the founder of Tell MAMA and Faith Matters

– Why did you think there was a need for a book that presents the true nature of Islam?

There is little literature that highlights the deep reflections and introspection that is taking place in parts of the Middle East around Islam. This work is being driven by Muslims and from an Islamic theological set of principles and this has been ongoing for over a decade. There is much talk about ‘Muslims not doing enough’ and we try to set out that maybe people are not looking over into what is happening and taking place in the Middle East to tackle extremism, but also in bridging the East and West.

There are lots of books and articles about Islam and whether it is ‘compatible’ with Western values. We outline the fact that Islam and its interpretation are flexible enough and compatible enough with a Europe that is based on secular and liberal traditions – though these are also being challenged by the rise of populist and xenophobic parties in Europe. This book thereby undermines the view that Europe and the Middle East will be in perpetual conflict. From within the heart of the Islamic world, in Jordan – with a deep Islamic history – we see that some of the solutions to extremism have come through strong leadership and from Islamic theological leaders coming together. There is hope and this hope must win over the politics of fear which is fuelling anti-Muslim prejudice and Islamophobia in some parts of Europe.

– Could you briefly summarise the King of Jordan’s Amman Message for people who are unaware of it?

The Amman Message, in summary, is a nationwide Jordanian attempt to provide a set of theological frameworks to tackle extremism. At the core of this, was a response from Jordan’s Royal family that something needed to be done to provide an Islamic theological set of positions against extremism post the Beslan massacre that horrified so many. The Beslan massacre was a driver for the His Majesty King Abdullah II to push for a theological framework through which religious leaders, civil society activists and community leaders could challenge extremism and build resilience in Jordanian communities. Yet, the vision was wider and there was a genuine belief that that Amman Message could be promoted and pushed in the Middle East and also within Europe, so that it could also challenge perceptions of Muslims in Europe which have been progressively been turning negative. It was a vision of a Europe and Middle East that were co-dependent and reliant on each other to tackle issues of extremism.

– In your opinion, what is the most interesting issue that the book raises?

The book raises a range of issues. It looks at Muslim communities in Europe, challenges that they face and how there are developments emanating from the heart of Muslim majority countries that can reduce Islamic extremism. It also looks at the challenges within Europe of a rising set of issues around migration, integration and extremism, whilst reflecting on Islamophobia and anti-Muslim prejudice that further fuels separationism and grievances. This cycle is one that the book explores with views from across Europe and the Middle East.

– The book presents perspectives from writers of various faiths, including those with no religious affiliation at all. What was the thinking behind this?

The reality is that the writers reflect Europe in all of its pluralism. It also reflects a world which is complex and with competing world views which are precisely reflective of debates on Islam and Muslims and on the relationship between Europe and the Middle East. This complex and fast shifting environment is what the book captures and provides a snapshot into a world where communities seem to be more fractured.

– What do you hope readers will take away from the book?

We hope that readers take away the hope that from within Muslim majority countries, the theological solutions to extremism are developing. They will have long lasting impacts over the next 50 years and readers should also take away the fact that there are challenges in Europe in reducing the xenophobia and populism that could well fuel further grievances and extremism in the future. We simply cannot afford to be complacent.

For more information and to buy the book, please follow this link.

Best Practice in Assessment and Intervention for Learners on the Autism Spectrum

The number of children identified with autism has more than doubled over the last decade. School-based professionals are now being asked to participate in the screening, assessment, and educational planning for children and youth on the spectrum more than at any other time in the recent past. Moreover, the call for greater use of evidence-based practice has increased demands that school personnel be prepared to recognize the presence of risk factors, engage in case finding, and be knowledgeable about “best practice” guidelines in assessment and intervention for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to ensure that students are being identified and provided with the appropriate programs and services.

Best practice guidelines are developed using the best available research evidence in order to provide professionals with evidence-informed recommendations that support practice and guide practitioner decisions regarding assessment and intervention. Best practice requires the integration of professional expertise, each student’s unique strengths and needs, family values and preferences, and the best research evidence into the delivery of services. Professionals and families collaborate and work together as partners to prioritize domains of functioning for assessment and intervention planning. Best practices for school-based practitioners are best practices for students and their families.

There are several important best practice considerations that should inform the assessment and intervention process. For example, a developmental perspective is critically important. While the core symptoms of autism are present during early childhood, ASD is a lifelong condition that affects the individual’s adaptive functioning from childhood through adulthood. Utilizing a developmental assessment framework provides a yardstick for understanding the severity and quality of delays or atypicality. A comprehensive developmental assessment approach requires the use of multiple measures including, but not limited to, verbal reports, direct observation, direct interaction and evaluation, and third-party reports. Interviews and observation schedules, together with an interdisciplinary assessment of social behavior, language and communication, adaptive behavior, motor skills, sensory issues, atypical behaviors, and cognitive functioning are recommended best practice procedures. Assessment is a continuous process, rather than a series of separate actions, and procedures may overlap and take place in tandem. Supporting children and youth with ASD also requires individualized and effective intervention strategies. It is critical that teachers, administrators, and other school personnel have an understanding of those strategies with a strong evidence base and demonstrated effectiveness to adequately address the needs of students on the spectrum and to help minimize the gap between research and practice.

Despite the significant increase in the number of journal articles, book chapters, textbooks, and various publications outlining information regarding educational practices, supports that are reportedly effective for students on the spectrum, the existing literature can often be confusing and at times conflicting. As a result, there continues to be a need for an up-to-date resource that provides school-based professionals and allied practitioners with a best practice guide to screening, assessment and intervention that can be used easily and efficiently in their every day work.

The award-winning book, A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools, 2nd Edition, provides a practical and scientifically-based approach to identifying, assessing, and treating children and adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in school settings. Fully updated to reflect the DSM-5 and current assessment tools, procedures and research, this fully revised and expanded second edition will support school-based professionals in a number of key areas including:

  • Screening and assessing children on the spectrum
  • Identifying evidence-based interventions and practices
  • Developing and implementing comprehensive educational programs
  • Providing family support and special needs advocacy
  • Promoting special needs advocacy

Each chapter features a consolidated and integrative description of best practice assessment and intervention/treatment approaches for learners on the autism spectrum. Combining current research evidence with theory and best practice, the text brings the topics of assessment and intervention together in a single authoritative resource guide consistent with recent advances in evidence-based practice. Illustrative case examples, glossary of terms, and helpful checklists and forms make this the definitive resource for identifying and implementing interventions for school-age children and youth with ASD.

This award-winning guide is intended to meet the needs of professionals such as educational and school psychologists, counselors, speech/language pathologists, occupational therapists, social workers, administrators, and both general and special education teachers. Parents, advocates, and community-based professionals will also find this guide a valuable and informative resource.

 

Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD, is a nationally certified and licensed school psychologist, chartered psychologist, registered psychologist, and certified cognitive-behavioral therapist. He is an Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society. He has published widely on the topic of autism spectrum disorders and is editor of a text in the American Psychological Association (APA) School Psychology Book Series, Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention in Schools. His book, Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum: A Self-Help Guide Using CBT, also published by JKP, was honored as an “Award-Winning Finalist in the “Health: Psychology/Mental Health” category of the 2016 Best Book Awards.”

Try these creative coping strategies to help young people manage stress, anxiety and other big feelings

Young people stressTry these creative coping strategies with young people aged 8-14 to help them manage stress, anxiety and other big feelings, taken from The Healthy Coping Colouring Book and Journal by Dr Pooky Knightsmith.

Click here to download the sample pages

This journal and colouring book is the perfect companion when faced with difficult thoughts and feelings. Whether you are stressed out at home or school, feeling anxious or simply in need of some relaxation, this workbook provides a place for you to express your emotions. Put your own personal stamp on colouring, journaling and drawing activities and explore healthy ways of coping with difficult feelings such as anger and anxiety through inspirational quotes, poems and practical advice.

With a range of activities that introduce mindfulness and encourage relaxation, this workbook will help young people aged 8-14 to develop the tools needed to prepare for and respond to future difficult situations. It is also an invaluable resource for parents and carers, teachers, counsellors and psychologists to use with young people in their care. Click here to find out more about the book.

If you would like to read more articles like Pooky’s and hear the latest news and offers on our Education and Mental Health books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer, and please also tell us about your areas of interest so we can send the most relevant information. You can unsubscribe at any time.

How to help children manage anxiety and embrace their imperfections

Rochel Lieberman, author of Pearla and her Unpredictably Perfect Day, an empowering story that teaches children how to embrace their mistakes and practice resilience, discusses how parents and professionals can use her book to help children who struggle with anxiety and perfectionism.

When I crafted the characters and the story line of Pearla and Her Unpredictably Perfect Day, I visualized creating a tool that can be easily used both at home and at school. My goal as an author was influenced by my perspective as an Executive Speech Coach, where I spend most of my time working with and on behalf of children. In that capacity, I have educated children, their teachers, therapists, principals, and leaders. Above all else, I’ve gone through this journey as a mom, working alongside educators, helping them bring out the best in their own pupils. Thus, I wrote this book with the following vision: for parents, a book that is simple and can be used flexibly in the fine balancing act that is required of parenthood; for schools, a guide for conversations between children and their teachers or therapists.

I have always viewed books as magical instruments, with the power to transcend reality while simultaneously reinforcing our daily experiences. About fifteen years ago, as a college student, I vividly recall riding a New York City bus alongside a mom and her adorable little boy. Like a real New Yorker, she had a great designer bag—yet with an odd rectangular object poking out of the side. My curiosity was short lived, as her son quickly became bored of looking out the window, prompting her to empty some of the treasures from her bag. Amidst the emerging apple sauce and fruit snacks, the large rectangular shape materialized as a children’s book, which allowed her to entertain and delight her son for the remainder of the bus ride. This mom recognized that alongside a cellphone, keys, and snacks, there was a treasure in carrying a children’s book.

Any adult who has ventured into the land of storytelling with a child knows how widespread the benefits can be. Stories let readers connect with characters, like Pearla, who are having similar challenges, but in a nonthreatening way. They open the door to on-the-spot questions and sometimes even deeper conversations about the way life works, even when it’s not working out well. My hope for parents is that by reading this book together with the child in your life, you can reflect on the story and learn to recognize the triggers that caused Pearla distress, such Pearla’s desire for perfection, and also learn from her healthy ability to strategize in times of stress. Then, you can have a purposeful conversation to relate these ideas, as applicable, to your own child’s obstacles.

For example, if your child struggles with anxiety from a need to perform perfect work, you can engage in a conversation about making mistakes in general and the thoughts and feelings associated with doing so. With Pearla’s fun storyline, my goal is that you can explore these normally sensitive topics in a casual mode, rather than in a “teaching” mode. To facilitate these conversations, I have included suggested questions in the back of the book. Some examples include questions for recognizing perfectionist tendencies (What do you like to have “perfect”?) and questions that allow the child to reframe their thinking about a perceived negative event (When does Pearla start to see that her cookies and cupcakes are perfect just the way they are?)  Keep in mind that these questions can be used as guides to formulate your own question, so that you can speak in a manner that is true to your own communicative style.

As parents, you can use your life experiences or situations other family members have encountered as examples, so your child is reminded that we all make mistakes. You can carry this one step further and talk about the idea that we all expect to make mistakes most every day, and we all have to deal with imperfect situations every day. If you expect to be going to a challenging place, with expected tension or changes of schedule, you can better prepare your child by using words to roleplay the situation and discuss which choices or behaviors are best suited to dealing with the expected encounter. In my experience, these conversations are best done either before or after an event, when the child is not in direct placement of the stressor. Remember, repairs are done after the rainstorm. In the middle of a challenging event, whisper words of encouragement and praise to your child. The longer talks, references to Pearla, and conversational questions can be saved for dry, sunny days.

The character of Pearla arose from my many joyful and zany experiences as a writer, as a mom raising my children, and from my years as a speech language therapist providing services to a wide range of children and adults. Through it all, I observed the growth and powerful learning that clients achieved when they courageously challenged their core beliefs on failure, perfection, and fear of daily challenges. All of us, children, adults, and caregivers alike, are on a journey with many bumps on the surprising road of life. While some of us learn to ride the bumps and face the challenges, others, like Pearla, find it very difficult to handle these imperfections without the help of a caring adult or professional.

A caring therapist, teacher, or allied professional can help children learn to accept impossible-to-avoid changes and challenges in their daily life. Remediating these negative and unhealthy beliefs and feelings is so important, because many times children and adults can carry these painful feelings, along with the ever elusive search for perfection and order, throughout their life’s journey. It is my dream that this book can be used as a tool to foster better social skills by sparking discussions in the classroom or in the safety of a therapist’s office at school or in private practice. The therapist can begin the sessions by attempting to understand the core of the child’s feelings about challenges and beliefs about making mistakes.

Research supports the calming effects of labeling an emotion, as is done in this story (look for the colored phrases in the text). In the privacy of a therapist office, where a child can relate their own story, the therapist can help them label their emotions, using the book as a model. The child and therapist can talk about everyday situations where they may be triggered to experience those emotions. Then, to advance the conversation, the therapist can use the time to problem solve with the child and generate solutions for these everyday experiences.  They can discuss possible scenarios or alternative plans that Pearla may have done that would not have been beneficial, such as screaming, stomping her feet or having a tantrum in front of the customers. This can lead to practical discussions about the consequences for each of the solutions that the child suggested.

In a more structured format, the therapist can probe the child with the following questions from the book’s suggested questions in order to help the child recognize emotions (What part of your body begins to hurt when you feel afraid?), to bring awareness to the words that the child says to himself (What words do you think when you feel afraid?) or to gently elicit support for the child (What thoughts can you think to help you feel less afraid?). These conversations are essential, as research supports that the specific words that you say to yourself  can alter the way you behave. Answers to these questions will slowly open the door to dealing with daily challenges and imperfections. As one client once said to me, “I am good even though I am not perfect.” There is a lot to be learned from the wisdom in those words. Enjoy reading Pearla and Her Unpredictably Perfect Day with the child in your life and let the talking and learning begin.

 

You can learn more, read reviews, or purchase a copy of Pearla and her Unpredictably Perfect Day here. To learn more about the author, visit Rochel Lieberman at www.ariberspeech.com, or connect with her on Facebook or Twitter.