Tips to help children with ADHD develop self-control, concentration and problem-solving skills

ADHD supportSusan Young, author of The STAR Program, talks about the innovative methods she has developed to help children with ADHD  develop their self-control, concentration and problem-solving skills.

I started working with young people with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) over 20 years ago. The clinical picture has changed over these years due to research, which has considerably advanced our scientific knowledge and understanding about the aetiology, presentation, treatment and prognosis of ADHD. ADHD is now recognised to be a lifespan condition yet, despite international guidelines on the assessment, treatment and management of ADHD, too many young people reach adulthood with undiagnosed ADHD. As a psychologist, I am less concerned with a “clinical” diagnosis than the functional problems associated with inattention and the immediate or longer-term effects on a child’s development and life satisfaction. As a mother I know how worrying this can be and, as a clinician, I know that steps can be taken to help and support a child in overcoming these difficulties. I know how important it is for everyone to work together to help children effect change in their lives, so I wanted to develop an intervention that may involve teachers, parents/carers and the children themselves. We do not often intervene directly with children and treatments: we usually aim to make change by teaching those who interact with them to change the environment around them in some way. I think this underestimates our children’s abilities and misses an important opportunity. Why can we teach children academic skills but not life skills? I wrote the STAR Intervention to provide these life skills to children, their parents/carers and, hopefully, others involved in their care. Continue reading

Take a look at our new Pastoral Care and Special Educational Needs catalogue

Our education resources offer valuable guidance on important school issues such as mental health, special educational needs, autism, bullying and peer pressure, safeguarding, restorative justice, sex education, trauma and attachment, gender diversity and more.

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Strategies in Supporting Children with Special Needs around Death and Dying

“My grandma isn’t a dinosaur. Why are the dinosaurs in this book teaching about death?”

“My dad’s not a leaf. I don’t understand what falling leaves have to do with him dying.”

“My aunt died. Why is everyone saying she’s in a better place?”

Metaphors, symbolic language, euphemisms. These all present challenges for many children with special needs who process information in a concrete manner. The quotes above encapsulate some of the feedback we have heard during our work in hospice care and in special education, as parents describe their struggle with explaining death and dying to their children. We wrote I Have a Question about Death: A Book for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder or Other Special Needs to address these challenges, and to create a book that parents and caregivers can read with all children. Continue reading

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teacher resourcesSign up to our mailing list to receive a free copy of our new Pastoral Care and Special Educational Needs catalogue.

Our resources offer valuable guidance on important school issues such as mental health, special educational needs, autism, bullying & peer pressure, safeguarding, restorative justice, sex education & more.

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What is the science behind being creative and why are people with dyslexia so good at it?

Dyslexia CreativityMargaret Malpas, author of Self-fulfilment with Dyslexia, provides an overview of the creative process in a person’s brain and explores the reasons why creativity is a particular strength of people with dyslexia.

Click here to read the extract

Her book, printed on cream paper so that it is easy on the eye, is a very simple to follow guide designed to help people with dyslexia make the most of their true potential. Royalties from the sale of the book will be donated to the British Dyslexia Association. Find out more about the book here.

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With dyslexia comes the determination to succeed – Margaret Malpas

dyslexiaMargaret Malpas, author of Self-fulfilment with Dyslexia, explains how it is not just talent that makes people successful but rather the strength of character to succeed. Admitting that dyslexic people may well struggle academically at an early age, she nonetheless asserts that with dyslexia comes the determination to prove your critics wrong.

Download the extract

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Try this simple maths game for primary school children

Try this fun and engaging maths game designed to teach primary school children how to count and recognise simple patterns, taken from Claire Brewer and Kate Bradley’s new book 101 Inclusive and SEN Maths Lessons for P Level Learning.

Pass the Parcel

Resources

  • A ‘pass the parcel’ set-up with shape symbols in each layer
  • Range of matching 2D shapes

Activity

  • The children sit in a circle.
  • In the middle of the circle an adult places all the 2D shapes so the children can see them clearly.
  • Play ‘Pass the parcel’. Each time the music stops and a child unwraps a layer to reveal a shape chard, the child has to find the matching shape from the middle of the circle.
  • At the end of the game, count all the shapes and see who has the most!

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Teach primary school children how to count with this fun lesson plan

Try this fun and engaging maths activity designed to teach primary school children how to count, taken from Claire Brewer and Kate Bradley’s new book 101 Inclusive and SEN Maths Lessons for P Level Learning.

Magic Number

Resources

Whiteboard and pen for each child or number fan for each child

Activity

  • The teachers tells the children that they are thinking of a number.
  • Give the children some clues, such as ‘It is one more than three, or two times two.’
  • Ask the children to write the number on the board or find it on the number fan. After a few minutes say ‘One, two, three, show me’ and ask the class to show their numbers.
  • Everyone puts the board down and claps or stamps the total, and then takes another turn.

If you would like to read more articles like Claire and Kate’s and hear the latest news and offers on our Education books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer, and please also tell us about your areas of interest so we can send the most relevant information. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Try this fun maths activity to teach primary school children how to count

Try this fun and engaging maths activity designed to teach primary school children how to count, taken from Claire Brewer and Kate Bradley’s new book 101 Inclusive and SEN Maths Lessons for P Level Learning.

Flying Saucersmaths activity

Resources

Large ball or material shaped into a circle, pre-made spaceman/alien masks or hats (not essential!)

Activity

  • In a group of five the children stand around the ball/material
  • The adult sings ‘Five little men in a flying saucer’ with actions as follows:
  • ‘Flew around the world one day’ – children pretend to fly around the ball/material
  • ‘They looked left and right’ – turn heads left and right
  • ‘But they didn’t like the sight’ – tap foot, shake head and wag finger
  • ‘So one man flew away’ – one child pretends to fly away from group and sits on the floor until the song has finished.

Continue reading

Fun activities to teach primary school children how to count

primary school children countTry this fun and engaging maths activity designed to teach primary school children how to count, taken from Claire Brewer and Kate Bradley’s new book 101 Inclusive and SEN Maths Lessons for P Level Learning.

Number Towers

Resources

  • Construction bricks
  • Laminated number cards
  • Bag

Activity

  • Each child and the teacher have a pile of construction bricks in front of them.
  • The teachers reaches into the bag and takes out a number. When the teacher says ‘Read, steady, go’ all the children need to build a tower with that number of bricks.
  • Count the bricks together.
  • The next child takes a number out of the bag and says ‘Read, steady, go.’ Continue around the group.

Continue reading