What is the science behind being creative and why are people with dyslexia so good at it?

Dyslexia CreativityMargaret Malpas, author of Self-fulfilment with Dyslexia, provides an overview of the creative process in a person’s brain and explores the reasons why creativity is a particular strength of people with dyslexia.

Click here to read the extract

Her book, printed on cream paper so that it is easy on the eye, is a very simple to follow guide designed to help people with dyslexia make the most of their true potential. Royalties from the sale of the book will be donated to the British Dyslexia Association. Find out more about the book here.

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With dyslexia comes the determination to succeed – Margaret Malpas

dyslexiaMargaret Malpas, author of Self-fulfilment with Dyslexia, explains how it is not just talent that makes people successful but rather the strength of character to succeed. Admitting that dyslexic people may well struggle academically at an early age, she nonetheless asserts that with dyslexia comes the determination to prove your critics wrong.

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No matter how young the child, honesty is the best way…


That is according to Nathalie Slosse, author of Big Tree is Sick, who tells the story of how the book came to be, as well as laying out her case for complete honesty as the best way to engage with children when helping them to understand serious illness.

In surveys on what values ​​we consider important, honesty is always highly rated, usually even as the most important quality. However, when it comes to honestly confiding something serious to our children, we often want to spare them the grief that the harsh truth can bring. It is a dilemma I struggled with when I was treated for breast cancer, and it’s why I want to provide a resource to others in the same situation today.

Sometimes people ask me “Did breast cancer change your way of life?” I wish I could reply that this was not the case; it’s true that prior to my diagnosis I followed my heart when it came to important life choices. But if I’m honest, I must admit that without the painful episode in 2007, I would not be doing what I do now. The battle I had with breast cancer as a mum of a two year old boy helped me discover that I can help people find happiness in difficult circumstances. In 2010 I founded the association Talismanneke to further explore that path.

But let’s start at the beginning.

Continue reading

Disruptive, stubborn, out of control? How can we tackle challenging behaviour in schools?

disruptive behaviourIn this extract from Disruptive, Stubborn, Out of Control?, Clinical Psychologist Bo Hejlskov Elvén looks at the psychology behind children’s behaviour and offers fresh advice to teachers on how to handle confrontation in the classroom. Referring to his method as the low arousal approach, he puts forward that it is best not to rise to the bait, but to act moderately in order to restore harmony and gain the student’s trust.

Click here to download the extract

With many examples of typical confrontational behaviours and clues for how to understand and resolve the underlying issues, his book provides an innovative approach to restructuring the teacher-student relationship. Click here to find out more about the book.

If you would like to read more articles like Bo’s and hear the latest news and offers on our Education books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer, and please also tell us about your areas of interest so we can send the most relevant information. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Best Practice in Assessment and Intervention for Learners on the Autism Spectrum

The number of children identified with autism has more than doubled over the last decade. School-based professionals are now being asked to participate in the screening, assessment, and educational planning for children and youth on the spectrum more than at any other time in the recent past. Moreover, the call for greater use of evidence-based practice has increased demands that school personnel be prepared to recognize the presence of risk factors, engage in case finding, and be knowledgeable about “best practice” guidelines in assessment and intervention for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to ensure that students are being identified and provided with the appropriate programs and services.

Best practice guidelines are developed using the best available research evidence in order to provide professionals with evidence-informed recommendations that support practice and guide practitioner decisions regarding assessment and intervention. Best practice requires the integration of professional expertise, each student’s unique strengths and needs, family values and preferences, and the best research evidence into the delivery of services. Professionals and families collaborate and work together as partners to prioritize domains of functioning for assessment and intervention planning. Best practices for school-based practitioners are best practices for students and their families.

There are several important best practice considerations that should inform the assessment and intervention process. For example, a developmental perspective is critically important. While the core symptoms of autism are present during early childhood, ASD is a lifelong condition that affects the individual’s adaptive functioning from childhood through adulthood. Utilizing a developmental assessment framework provides a yardstick for understanding the severity and quality of delays or atypicality. A comprehensive developmental assessment approach requires the use of multiple measures including, but not limited to, verbal reports, direct observation, direct interaction and evaluation, and third-party reports. Interviews and observation schedules, together with an interdisciplinary assessment of social behavior, language and communication, adaptive behavior, motor skills, sensory issues, atypical behaviors, and cognitive functioning are recommended best practice procedures. Assessment is a continuous process, rather than a series of separate actions, and procedures may overlap and take place in tandem. Supporting children and youth with ASD also requires individualized and effective intervention strategies. It is critical that teachers, administrators, and other school personnel have an understanding of those strategies with a strong evidence base and demonstrated effectiveness to adequately address the needs of students on the spectrum and to help minimize the gap between research and practice.

Despite the significant increase in the number of journal articles, book chapters, textbooks, and various publications outlining information regarding educational practices, supports that are reportedly effective for students on the spectrum, the existing literature can often be confusing and at times conflicting. As a result, there continues to be a need for an up-to-date resource that provides school-based professionals and allied practitioners with a best practice guide to screening, assessment and intervention that can be used easily and efficiently in their every day work.

The award-winning book, A Best Practice Guide to Assessment and Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Schools, 2nd Edition, provides a practical and scientifically-based approach to identifying, assessing, and treating children and adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in school settings. Fully updated to reflect the DSM-5 and current assessment tools, procedures and research, this fully revised and expanded second edition will support school-based professionals in a number of key areas including:

  • Screening and assessing children on the spectrum
  • Identifying evidence-based interventions and practices
  • Developing and implementing comprehensive educational programs
  • Providing family support and special needs advocacy
  • Promoting special needs advocacy

Each chapter features a consolidated and integrative description of best practice assessment and intervention/treatment approaches for learners on the autism spectrum. Combining current research evidence with theory and best practice, the text brings the topics of assessment and intervention together in a single authoritative resource guide consistent with recent advances in evidence-based practice. Illustrative case examples, glossary of terms, and helpful checklists and forms make this the definitive resource for identifying and implementing interventions for school-age children and youth with ASD.

This award-winning guide is intended to meet the needs of professionals such as educational and school psychologists, counselors, speech/language pathologists, occupational therapists, social workers, administrators, and both general and special education teachers. Parents, advocates, and community-based professionals will also find this guide a valuable and informative resource.

 

Lee A. Wilkinson, PhD, is a nationally certified and licensed school psychologist, chartered psychologist, registered psychologist, and certified cognitive-behavioral therapist. He is an Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society. He has published widely on the topic of autism spectrum disorders and is editor of a text in the American Psychological Association (APA) School Psychology Book Series, Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Evidence-Based Assessment and Intervention in Schools. His book, Overcoming Anxiety and Depression on the Autism Spectrum: A Self-Help Guide Using CBT, also published by JKP, was honored as an “Award-Winning Finalist in the “Health: Psychology/Mental Health” category of the 2016 Best Book Awards.”

Try these creative coping strategies to help young people manage stress, anxiety and other big feelings

Young people stressTry these creative coping strategies with young people aged 8-14 to help them manage stress, anxiety and other big feelings, taken from The Healthy Coping Colouring Book and Journal by Dr Pooky Knightsmith.

Click here to download the sample pages

This journal and colouring book is the perfect companion when faced with difficult thoughts and feelings. Whether you are stressed out at home or school, feeling anxious or simply in need of some relaxation, this workbook provides a place for you to express your emotions. Put your own personal stamp on colouring, journaling and drawing activities and explore healthy ways of coping with difficult feelings such as anger and anxiety through inspirational quotes, poems and practical advice.

With a range of activities that introduce mindfulness and encourage relaxation, this workbook will help young people aged 8-14 to develop the tools needed to prepare for and respond to future difficult situations. It is also an invaluable resource for parents and carers, teachers, counsellors and psychologists to use with young people in their care. Click here to find out more about the book.

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New Graphic Book prize for schools – sponsored by Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Graphic Book Prize SchoolsFor 2017 the Stationers’ Company is launching a new Graphic Books category in their Shine School Media Awards. The Awards are open to all secondary schools and are designed to encourage team work and develop interest in the world of print and publishing.

JKP will consider the winning entry of the Graphic Books category for publication.

Guidelines for entry:

The winning entry will explore either:

  • A contemporary social issue of your choice, such as poverty, refugees, migration, social inequality, homelessness, the situation of a minority
  • Or, a mental health issue of particular concern to young people, such as anxiety, exam stress, bullying, lack of confidence, depression

The Graphic Book should aim to leave the reader understanding more about the subject of the book, even to have changed their mind about it. Great Graphic Books combine words and pictures to say something similar that neither words nor pictures can do separately. Consider how your images support the text, and vice versa.

  • Entries may be in full colour, a restricted colour palette, or black and white
  • Page size should be a minimum of 120mm x 170mm and a maximum of 210mm x 298mm
  • Extent, a minimum 8 pages
  • The Competition is open to all secondary schools in England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and Eire
  • The closing date for entries is the 7th April 2017

For more information and to enter, visit the Shine School Media Awards website. We look forward to seeing your submissions!

The extraordinary projects making mental health a key player in the school day

mental health schoolsJenny Hulme, author of The School of Wellbeing, discusses her new book and the projects she’s explored that support students’ emotional wellbeing. At a time when the state of young people’s mental health is being recognised as central to their learning and attainment, her book gives unique insight into these projects and features the education leaders and charities behind them, including Place2Be, Kidscape, Beat and more.

When I started writing this book a year ago, the media were talking, ever more urgently, about the epidemic of young people at odds with the world around them. Research was suggesting rates of depression were rising in primary schools and anxiety among teenagers had increased by 70 per cent in the past 25 years. Meanwhile, reports noted the rapid rise in hospital admissions for young people with eating disorders. Every story posed more questions than answers about the role of everything from poverty to education policy, exam stress to social media. Other more recent headlines included news of a 14 per cent rise in teenagers being admitted to hospital after self-harming, with the NSPCC saying they delivered thousands of counselling sessions on self-harm last year (as many as 50 a day) via Childline. It was heartening to read at the same time talk of the Government making relationships and sexual health a statutory subject to tackle the problem of sexual harassment and sexting in schools. But developments like this come not a moment too soon. Continue reading

Try this simple maths game for primary school children

Try this fun and engaging maths game designed to teach primary school children how to count and recognise simple patterns, taken from Claire Brewer and Kate Bradley’s new book 101 Inclusive and SEN Maths Lessons for P Level Learning.

Pass the Parcel

Resources

  • A ‘pass the parcel’ set-up with shape symbols in each layer
  • Range of matching 2D shapes

Activity

  • The children sit in a circle.
  • In the middle of the circle an adult places all the 2D shapes so the children can see them clearly.
  • Play ‘Pass the parcel’. Each time the music stops and a child unwraps a layer to reveal a shape chard, the child has to find the matching shape from the middle of the circle.
  • At the end of the game, count all the shapes and see who has the most!

If you would like to read more articles like Claire and Kate’s and hear the latest news and offers on our Education books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer, and please also tell us about your areas of interest so we can send the most relevant information. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Try this fun maths activity to teach primary school children how to count

Try this fun and engaging maths activity designed to teach primary school children how to count, taken from Claire Brewer and Kate Bradley’s new book 101 Inclusive and SEN Maths Lessons for P Level Learning.

Flying Saucersmaths activity

Resources

Large ball or material shaped into a circle, pre-made spaceman/alien masks or hats (not essential!)

Activity

  • In a group of five the children stand around the ball/material
  • The adult sings ‘Five little men in a flying saucer’ with actions as follows:
  • ‘Flew around the world one day’ – children pretend to fly around the ball/material
  • ‘They looked left and right’ – turn heads left and right
  • ‘But they didn’t like the sight’ – tap foot, shake head and wag finger
  • ‘So one man flew away’ – one child pretends to fly away from group and sits on the floor until the song has finished.

Plenary activity

Everyone lies back on the floor and relaxes. Put one hand in the air showing five fingers; sing the song quietly, this time indicating numbers using fingers.

Consolidation activity

Outside and in the playground play other number rhyme songs such as ‘Five little frogs’ in a similar way.

Skills learned

  • Auditory: listen to oral cues
  • Communication: respond to cues
  • Gross motor: large movements as part of songs
  • Kinaesthetic: completing song actions
  • Social communication: working in a small group

If you would like to read more articles like Claire and Kate’s and hear the latest news and offers on our Education books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer, and please also tell us about your areas of interest so we can send the most relevant information. You can unsubscribe at any time.