Designing The Princess and the Fog

What better way to explain depression to children than with a relatable and enjoyable storybook full of vibrant illustrations? The author of The Princess and the Fog, Lloyd Jones, reveals the motivation behind designing this book and its characters in his distinctive and colourful style. This content was originally posted on Lloyd’s blog.


The Princess


I chose a princess as the protagonist of my book because it is an archetypical character in children’s fiction. If you know that a picture book is about a princess, you can infer a lot about what the story, setting and characters are likely to be based on the countless princess stories you’re already familiar with. I was then able to turn that on its head by introducing new elements to surprise the reader and make the main character of the story much more relatable.

Additionally, princesses are typically revered and looked up to by the children who read their stories. They are something that a lot of young girls in particular strive to be. If a princess can get depression, anyone can. I think it’s important that the children who read my story can relate to its protagonist in quite a personal way so that they know that they aren’t alone and that this thing that they’re struggling with that they can’t explain can happen to just about anyone else. Depression can make you feel very alone, so just knowing that there is someone out there – even a fictional princess – who is going through something similar can be a huge comfort.


The Setting


The setting of The Princess and the Fog is a strange mix of traditional old-fashioned fairy tale and modern day. A huge purple castle sits at the heart of a bustling modern metropolis. The Princess rides horses, everyone else drives cars. Television and print media apparently exist but so do knights and adventurers with swords and shields. This, again, is designed to make the story relatable on a number of different levels. Children will find the fairy tale elements of the situations as familiar as the real life ones.

In my research into writing for children I learned of the importance of metaphor. Children do not tend to like stories with aggressive morals. While the book deals with real-life problems, I have managed to avoid “outing” the children who read it by disguising the issues that young readers may be facing behind metaphors. Readers may understand that the book is describing a situation similar to their own without feeling like it’s singling them out or trying to teach them a lesson. The story is designed to be enjoyed in its own right but with a hidden depth to it that should communicate with any young readers who are feeling the same way as The Princess.


The Fog


In my early design ideas for the book I was toying with various ideas for how to represent depression visually. I had previously used the idea of a hole in one’s chest and an obscured, scribbled out face in an earlier independent project called There’s A Hole In My Chest and didn’t want to use it again as I thought it would be too grim for children. Early ideas included some kind of slow, lazy slime monster not unlike The Doldrums in The Phantom Tollbooth, a hat or helmet of some kind that couldn’t be taken off once it was put on, and a ball and chain, but none of these quite described the feeling adequately. I decided that whatever it was it needed to be opaquely black, thick, impossible to remove and in some way at least partially obscure the protagonist’s head and face to create a sense of loneliness and isolation from the outside world.


The title The Princess and the Fog popped into my head one day and it just fit perfectly. It ticked all the boxes, I could illustrate it in a similar frustrated scribbly way as the obscured faces in There’s A Hole In My Chest, and I just couldn’t resist the pun. The exact depiction of The Fog developed considerably  over the course of making the book before I settled on how it looks in the final product, particularly after notes that it obscured too much of The Princess’s face and could be seen as scary for some readers.


The King and Queen


It was important to me to have the King and Queen both appear very physically strong, in their own ways. The Queen is extremely tall with very large legs but she’s very thin and a little unbalanced, while The King is short and squat with diddy little legs but with a very large upper body. In this way, it shows that they each have their own strengths that make them a very well-balanced team, both as parents, supporters and as the co-rulers of the unnamed kingdom in which the story takes place. Most children will look to their parents as their first port of call in times of crisis and The Princess is no different. The King and Queen are the first two characters to offer help to The Princess in dealing with her affliction. Although they get it a bit wrong at first, they are an essential part of the large support network The Princess is eventually able to put together. I hope any parental figures reading this book will be inspired to be as strong and determined as The King and Queen.


The Supporting Cast


The other characters in the story that The Princess eventually enlists for her support network all play important parts in aiding her gradual recovery. Most of them straddle that same weird line between fairy tale and reality by representing both a trustworthy adversary one might find in the battle against depressive illness and a friendly fantasy character. The Druid, for example, brews up some potions for The Princess to try to help her fight away the fog.


With his lab coat and diplomas, The Druid is clearly a metaphor for a doctor offering to help medicate the problem. But not everybody responds to medication. Everybody experiences depression differently and no one cure exists that will work for everyone, so I felt it important that the story never explicitly states which of the many solutions The Princess uses to try to rid herself of The Fog actually ultimately works.

Lloyd Jones lives in the south of England. Lloyd has a first class honours degree in Illustration from the University of Portsmouth, an MA in Sequential Design and Illustration from the University of Brighton and he is currently working on a PGCE FE from the University of Southampton. He has learned to live with his fog, rather than suffer from it. Learn more about The Princess and the Fog


Exclusive look at The Princess and the Fog

Enjoy this sneak peek at The Princess and the Fog, JKP’s latest children’s book. Vibrantly illustrated, this book was designed to be read with children aged 5-7 who are suffering from depression. 



Once upon a time there was a Princess. She had everything a little girl could ever want, and she was happy. That is, until the fog came…


Jones- princess and the fog - pgs 9 - 16 - extract-2 Jones- princess and the fog - pgs 9 - 16 - extract-3 Jones- princess and the fog - pgs 9 - 16 - extract-4 Jones- princess and the fog - pgs 9 - 16 - extract-5



Lloyd Jones lives in the south of England. Lloyd has a first class honours degree in Illustration from the University of Portsmouth, an MA in Sequential Design and Illustration from the University of Brighton and he is currently working on a PGCE FE from the University of Southampton. He has learned to live with his fog, rather than suffer from it. Learn more about The Princess and the Fog


What about parents who aren’t able to emotionally connect with their child?

Jane Evans, trauma parenting specialist and author of Kit Kitten and the Topsy-Turvy Feelings and How Are You Feeling Today Baby Bear?, writes about the importance of giving children the best chance to catch up on their emotional awareness and build their emotional vocabulary.

Evans-KitKitten-C2WThere are many reasons why a parent or carer might not be able to be emotionally connected and available to a child. It might be that they did not have that kind of childhood so they aren’t aware of the benefits of talking with a child about their own and others’ feelings. Or, it could be that they are preoccupied with their own unmet emotional needs, living with domestic abuse, addiction, an eating disorder, high levels of stress and anxiety or other physical or mental illness, any of which could create a distance between them and the child they are raising.

What it doesn’t mean is that they don’t love their child as that’s a different matter altogether, it’s often more that they are not able to tune into and regulate their child’s emotional needs and state. This can have a lasting impact on all areas of a child’s development as they may struggle to express and cope with their daily emotions and this can then get in the way of their learning, being able to make friends, have fun and enjoy a carefree childhood.


The story of Kit Kitten shows how Kit becomes withdrawn, watchful and is often overwhelmed by not being able to put feelings into words and from not having a close adult to help unpack all of them in a safe and manageable way. This is something I have repeatedly seen in the parents, children and young people I have been working with for over two decades now. It causes such emotional distress and anxiety, and often leads to mental and physical illness from the stress of feeling emotionally invisible, stuck, overwhelmed and isolated.

Kit Kitten and the Topsy-Turvy Feelings aims to address this missing emotional connection early on to offer children the best chance to catch up on their emotional awareness and build their emotional vocabulary by encouraging adults to begin this vital work with them in a gentle way. Emotional intelligence is the key to good mental health, to being free to access learning and to building healthy long-term relationships for life.


‘If your emotional abilities aren’t in hand, if you don’t have self-awareness, if you are not able to manage your distressing emotions, if you can’t have empathy and have effective relationships, then no matter how smart you are, you are not going to get very far.’

– Daniel Goleman


You can find out more about Jane’s work, upcoming events and read more of her blog posts on her website: You can also follow her on twitter: @janeparenting2

Mental health support made simple

Following the second edition release of Introducing Mental Health, authors Connor and Caroline Kinsella provide insight into taking a more global and simplified approach to mental health support in the fully revised and updated second edition.


We wrote the original Introducing Mental Health: A Practical Guide to make the very complicated seem a little bit simpler and to help front-line workers do what often seems like the impossible. It’s not an easy role at the best of times, but much has happened in the nine years between editions to make the job of mental health care even more difficult than it was in 2006.

As thoroughly well behaved and professional writers (ahem) we chose not to fill the book with a long list of all that is wrong with UK mental health services. After all, most of our British readers need no reminders of the savage cuts, dwindling resources and disappearing in-patient beds that are now a feature of UK mental health.

But while it’s all very well to moan incessantly about our own back yard, we looked to the developing world for inspiration to update the simple, straightforward approach to mental health care embodied in the first edition. We’re lucky enough to have as a close friend one Vikram Patel, the Foreword writer of both editions, who is also the director of the Centre for Global Mental health, London. Vikram has spearheaded the global mental health movement which has helped make mental health a priority issue in those parts of the planet where malnutrition, malaria and HIV have traditionally demanded resources that truly put our own budget cuts and resource slashing into perspective. He is now on Time Magazine’s ‘World’s 100 Most Influential People’ list and we met up with him just as he had been interviewed for BBC Radio Four’s excellent The Life Scientific series.

It was a little strange sitting in a London pub with an old friend who is now the psychiatric equivalent of Kim Kardashian, albeit with a rather more worthwhile contribution to the world. While western psychiatry remains bound by an ever increasing list of obscure diagnoses, pharmacological treatments and reliance on highly trained professionals, the global mental health approach is a means of delivering care and support to communities without the need for complex resources, vast infrastructures or highly qualified personnel. Under this guise, mental health support is largely delivered by local people who, to put it quite simply, work with people not symptoms. In a word, it’s a very, very simple model of mental health care. And it works.

Psychiatry is, after all, a relatively straightforward science. It doesn’t take a master’s degree to recognise  when someone is severely depressed or saying bizarre things or taking an hour to leave their house because all the windows and doors need checking several dozen times. But supporting people through mental ill health can be anything but straightforward, and with qualified professionals and NHS facilities becoming ever more scarce, we now rely on police and prison officers, accident and emergency staff, housing support workers and (increasingly) friends and relatives to deal with our most needy and distressed people.

And while the poorest parts of the world begin to develop simple low-tech support systems that make optimal use of professional expertise combined with common-sense and the local knowledge of communities, the global mental health approach starts to look a lot like the sort of system that in many ways we in the UK are adopting by default.

We’ve written Introducing Mental Health twice, in both editions reflecting the many different scenarios and types of worker with whom we have worked in both clinical practice and training. We haven’t ignored the huge advances in the science of genetic and biological origins of mental illness, and have tried to make the science accessible to all. After all, there aren’t many people who would guess how much their Chinese takeaway has in common with the latest explanation of psychotic illness*. But above all we’ve strived to learn from Professor Patel and global mental health how this is above all a social issue, and how all of us have a part to play in helping our community’s most distressed and vulnerable people. It’s really surprisingly simple.

* Sorry. You’ll have to read the book to find the answer.


Caroline Kinsella has been a registered nurse since 1980 and has specialised in working with offenders and individuals with severe mental health problems. She has a Master’s degree in Forensic Mental Health from St Georges Hospital Medical School and is currently working with the Dorset Inreach Team as a mental health nurse assessing and care co-ordinating the needs of offenders in several Dorset prisons. Both Connor and Caroline live in Dorset, UK.
Connor Kinsella trained as a mental health nurse and has considerable experience of working with mentally ill people in both in-patient and community environments. Since 1998 he has designed and facilitated training for a wide range of services in health and social care. He writes a well-regarded blog called The Stuff of Social Care and has contributed to The Guardian’s Social Care Network.

To learn more about Introducing Mental Health click here.


Who takes care of the caregiver?

Shake up your view of your demanding and relentless work so that you can start to put yourself at the centre of your caregiving work. Cheryl Rezek, author of Mindfulness for Carers, has written an incredibly honest blog on why it’s important to say ‘no’, putting yourself first, and being mindful of your emotions as a carer.


Taking care of someone else = neglecting to take care of yourself.  Does this ring true for you?  A carer or caregiver is often prone to using all their time, energy and resources giving the person or persons the attention and support that is needed.  However, the danger that can arise is that the caring is only working in one direction.

This blog isn’t about patting you on the back, telling you that you really ought to get some rest or saying what a great job you are doing.  You know all these things already.  You should be patting yourself on the back for all that you do as well as making sure that you get enough sleep and keep your stress levels down.  The chances are you don’t do any of those things or the rest of the long list that could be tagged onto that one.  This blog is about shaking up your view of your demanding and relentless work so that you can start to put yourself at the centre of your caregiving work.

Possibly one of the most difficult issues with being a caregiver is setting boundaries.  To do this can set in motion a whole range of emotions and fears – I’m being selfish; I don’t need help; what if something happens when I’m resting or out?; how will the person manage without me?  These responses are common and, at times, come about for good reason.  To say No to someone, in any form, may seem like a mean, uncaring or unrealistic thing to do but this is not always the case.  On occasions, the caregiver’s anxieties and fears are greater than those coming from the person being cared for.  We often don’t want to admit, or even acknowledge, that our anxiety may be what is driving us to be overstretched rather than only the needs or demands of the situation.  Perhaps there are occasions when you could go out or ask someone else to take your place for a short time but you may be reluctant to do this.  Why?  What is the concern behind this?  Do you think you’ll be criticised?  Have you lost touch with so many of your friends that you don’t actually have anyone to go out with?  Is it easier being the round-the-clock caregiver than having to deal with some other issue in your life?  Does your position give you power in the family or at work that isn’t allowed to be questioned?  Does your role give you a strong sense of identity that you may not otherwise feel?  As a professional, are you needing to present in a certain way to your colleagues or do you perhaps enjoy the energy and status that may accompany the demands of the job?  These are important questions to ask yourself as without some answers you will struggle to find a place for yourself.  With all the good that is done by being the generous and attentive caregiver, it can also work against you.

Most carers don’t set out to be in that role, unless by choosing a career in it.  The vast majority of family carers are doing it because of circumstance, often thrust upon them in some harsh way.  The choices here are dramatically reduced but, in spite of that, you still have a choice about how you take care of yourself as well as the other person.

There are evident differences between being a family caregiver and a professional person who is in a helping profession.  Family carers or foster carers feel an enormous responsibility for the wellbeing, comfort and survival of their relative or foster child.  Needless to say, professional caregivers such as nurses, doctors, social workers, therapists and health assistant also feel such a sense of responsibility but there is an inevitable difference as the family ties, bonds and history aren’t there, and while loss may be felt, sometimes deeply, it is not felt in the same way or with the same level of intensity.  Professional carers go home at the end of the day, or shift, and if they don’t they ought to.

It is important to also raise the issue of being a family carer for someone with whom one does not have a good or loving relationship.  This situation is more common than most people would like to admit but the other person’s vulnerability makes it very difficult to say no or to set limits.  Caring out of a sense of duty or obligation can lead to resentment and distress.

Caregivers come in many shapes and forms and people are in those roles for as many different reasons – a parent to a sick or disabled child, a special education teacher, a hospice worker, an adult child of elderly or ill parents, a partner of chronically ill or terminal husband or wife, a young child of an ill parent, a foster carer, a medical doctor, a community nurse, a health assistant in a mental health unit, a social worker, a carer of younger siblings.  The list is endless but the demands and stress frequently similar.

The big question is how you take care of yourself and if you don’t, why not?  Burnout and fatigue can lead to physical and mental health issues.  These are damaging and you then run the risk of making mistakes, becoming unwell and, at worst, needing to be taken care of yourself.

Mindfulness is a gentle, accessible and nourishing way of reducing caregiver’s stress and increasing their wellbeing and attention.  Research has also shown how those being cared for by people using mindfulness benefit from their carers being more present and open to them.

We are human and no matter how resilient we believe we are, how physically strong we show ourselves to be or how psychologically grounded we say we are, we are still human and being human implies that we have thresholds of tolerance.  It’s not about breaking or collapsing in a heap but far more about recognising that as a caregiver you need to take care of yourself as well as the other person.

Dr Cheryl Rezek is a consultant clinical psychologist and mindfulness teacher who brings a fresh and novel approach to how mindfulness and psychological concepts can be integrated into everyone’s life as a way of managing it in the most helpful way.  She has a longstanding clinical and academic career as well as runs workshops and authors books.  You can find out more about Mindfulness for Carers, read reviews or order your copy here.


Helping traumatised children let go of control

9781849057608 (1)In this extract from Helping Children Affected by Parental Substance Abuse, author Tonia Caselman talks about the importance of giving children and young adults a safe space where they can let go of control and shed their feelings of responsibility. Following an in-depth exploration of how victims of parental substance abuse feel about control and responsibility, you’ll find two activities that will help you carry out direct work on an individual and group level.

Read the extract now


You can find out more about the book, read reviews and order your copy here.


Developing Luna: representing grief in childhood

Emmi Smid, author of Luna’s Red Hat, walks us through her creative process as she developed Luna’s character: from her name and her look, to her dress and her special hat.

The name Luna

The name Luna is not a coincidence.  Luna is Latin for moon. Symbolically, the name Luna stands for transition, renewal and balance, among other things. I thought it a suitable and hopeful name for a young girl who is coming to terms with the loss of her mother.

The Moon is also a place most ordinary people can’t reach. What goes on up there is incomprehensible to us. At some point in the story, we see Luna’s Mum depicted on the Moon, trapped in her own world and out of reach. People who have dealt with a suicidal loved one will be able to empathise with this.

luna page

Luna as a Rabbit

While I was developing Luna, I played with the idea of using an animal for the main character, as you can see in the sketches below, but eventually decided against this idea. Suicide is a fathomless notion, whether you are a child or an adult. In this specific case, I felt that it was very important to show children (and their family) that they are not the only ones going through this. Therefore, I wanted to illustrate a representation of an ordinary family.luna rabbit 2

luna rabbit

Luna as a girl

Ever since that I made that decision, Luna’s look went through quite a few changes – from using different materials, which gave her  a different feel as a character, to different heights; from tall and gangling to the petite but feisty 6-year-old she is now.luna girllcollage

luna sad



Luna in 3D

I also made a 3D version of Luna, so I could play with light sources and shadows, and use photos I took of her as a reference for my illustrations.


Luna’s Dress 

Luna’s dress, with its checked pattern, stayed the same throughout the process. It was inspired by a dress my Aunt Judith used to wear when she was around that age. The dress has appeared in several of my fine art pieces throughout the years, as you can see below, and finally found its destiny in this book.

luna dress


Luna’s Red Hat

Ironically, the thing I struggled drawing most was Luna’s red hat! It was either too small, too floppy, too big, too bonnet-y, too red, or not red enough, and even looked like a fire brigade hat or a UFO. You name it, I’ve drawn it, over and over again.

 luna red hat


Emmi Smid is a children’s book author and illustrator. She was born in the Netherlands but currently lives and works in Brighton, UK. Learn more about Luna’s Red Hat here.

The Story Behind Luna’s Red Hat

Featuring suicide in a picture book may sound like an unlikely combination to some people, which is why we’ve asked Emmi Smid, author of Luna’s Red Hat to explain what motivated her to write and illustrate Luna’s story.

That art is a necessity to society’s well-being and structure is, in my humble opinion, a fact; creative people have the ability to shine a light on important matters from different perspectives. Through their words, visuals and sounds, these products of creativity encourage us to ‘think outside the box’, touch people’s hearts and bring people closer together.

My background originates in Fine Art. With my above-mentioned image of “The Artist” in mind, I struggled to find the ‘use’ for my own art within our modern day society. What do I have to offer that could potentially add something positive to how we think about and deal with current social matters?

During my time at the University of Brighton, where I read for a Masters degree called Sequential Design/Illustration, I started revaluing the importance of the picture book, and how a balanced ‘marriage’ between words and pictures can teach not only children, but also adults, simple but profound lessons in life. So, I started by revisiting my collection of picture books that handle the topic of death: Michael Rosen’s Sad Book, Wolf Erlbruch’s Duck, Death and the Tulip, Oliver Jeffers’ The Heart and the Bottle, among others. Then the penny dropped. As beautiful and heartfelt as each of these picture books were, none of them touched upon the topic of loss through suicide. I noticed this because I have lost loved ones to suicide. I was 16 when my friend Bram committed suicide. We were the same age, and we were raised on the same street. We went to primary school together, and after that to secondary school. As far as I knew Bram was always going to be a part of my life, until he wasn’t. His sudden death came as a shock to all of us – Bram’s family first of all, my family, our mutual friends and their families, our teachers, the school, there was a real ripple effect.

In the spring of 2009, when I was 21 and had moved from my home country the Netherlands to England to study Fine Art at University College Falmouth, my aunt Judith committed suicide. She left behind her two daughters, Merel and Silke, aged 14 and 10 at the time. Being away from home, I felt rather disconnected from my family. I was concerned about my cousins – with all of us struggling to grasp the notion of suicide and getting our lives back on track, how were my cousins going to deal with this at their age? I felt powerless and useless.

Fast-forward to January 2014, and there I was discussing the idea of designing a picture book about dealing with loss through suicide with one of my tutors at the University of Brighton. I was very passionate about the idea but the fact that there weren’t many books about the topic made me doubt myself. “If you are not sure, then maybe you should start by finding out why there aren’t many children’s books about suicide?” my tutor suggested. So I sat down and came up with a number of reasons why: the notion of death is difficult enough for children, let alone dying by apparent ‘choice’; we live in a society where children are wrapped up in cotton wool and are protected from real life for as long as possible; Suicide is still a social taboo.

None of these reasons felt very satisfying – in fact, the more I thought about it, the stronger the urge became to confront and perhaps even tackle those reasons. Children are as clever as adults, with the difference that they lack life experience. The only way for adults to help children gain life experience is to provide them with the tools to deal with life, as and when it happens. Social taboos are created and perpetuated the same way: it all boils down to our own lack of tools to be able to empathise rather than judge, communicate rather than ignore, and confront rather than beat around the bush.

Unfortunately, people commit suicide. I have felt isolated and lonely when trying to deal with overcoming the loss of my friend and my aunt, and I have seen the effects it has had on my family and friends. If we adults are struggling, then how will young children deal with such a loss? Determined and on a mission, I created the first series of sketches telling Luna’s story:

ext 2



I posted the sketches on my blog and asked people for feedback. The reply of Alexis Deacon (writer and illustrator of picture books such as Beegu) made me take a step back and reconsider my approach: “You might try offsetting the sadness with moments of humour or just exploring different kinds of sadness. After all, the message is an important one and you are more likely to reach a wider audience if you don’t club people round the head with it!”

extt 1

Considering the sensitivity of the topic, I also decided to get feedback from specialists in the field. During my research I read the book Couldn’t You Stay for Me? by Dutch bereavement specialist Dr Riet Fiddelaers-Jaspers and contacted her. Riet has been an immense help ever since, providing me with feedback regarding different stages of grief and sharing her expertise with me. She also agreed to write the ‘Guide for Parents’, her contribution in the back of Luna’s Red Hat, which is designed to help parents, carers, teachers and professionals to support and communicate with children who have lost a loved one through suicide.

ext 3

In search for feedback from parents who have been through similar situations, I contacted Belgian bereavement institution Werkgroep Verder. They agreed to share my manuscript with some of their clients, and I received some very useful and eye-opening replies. The one that got to me most was feedback regarding one of my illustrations. I wanted to show Luna being overwhelmed by her own anger, through drawing a big metaphorical red wave of anger behind her. A parent rightfully pointed out that one never knows whether the child was exposed to the incident, and that “splashes of red liquid” may cause further pain. I instantly decided to make the wave blue instead.

luna 1


Designing Luna’s Red Hat has been a tough but blessed learning curve, personally as well as professionally. There are many more insights into the process that I could show you, but the main insight I would like to share with you, is that we can learn to embrace our losses together, however heartbreaking they may be. I wasn’t able to physically be there for my cousins Merel and Silke when they lost their mother, but I dedicate this book to them. If Luna’s Red Hat could provide parents and their children with a new perspective or hope in even the slightest way possible, then that would mean the world to me.

Emmi Smid is a children’s book author and illustrator. She was born in the Netherlands but currently lives and works in Brighton, UK. Learn more about Luna’s Red Hat here.


luna 2


Thoughts behind ‘The Music of Being’

Levinge_Music-of-Being_978-1-84905-576-5_colourjpg-printIn The Music of Being, Alison Levinge explains the approaches of key child development theorists and explores how they apply to and inform the practice of music therapy. In this article, she discusses the inspiration behind writing this unique book and how she feels Winnicott’s theories resonate with the central aspects of music therapy.

We only have to observe a mother with her baby to realize that we are deeply musical beings. Training as a musician, combined with an understanding of human development, has led me to consider the significance of this medium and in particular, its value as a therapeutic tool.

No matter what our musical preferences may be, whatever our age, where we live or more significantly, in what ways we may find life difficult, music can enable us to connect more deeply to who we really are. And this can happen even when we are yet to be born!

Our early experiences are impressed upon not only our physical being but also upon our cognitive and psychological states of mind. But what is it like to be a baby? How do we let people know what we are feeling? How do we ask for what we need when we do not have words? Above all, what is it that we require in order to help us along the journey of life in a healthy way? Through helping children and adults who have difficulties, I discovered the value of music and its remarkable ability to engage a child or adult in a relationship. I discovered music, in fact, is a universal language.

In the world of words, there are many who have studied early development. Donald Winnicott, a pediatrician and psychoanalyst, is one who dedicated his life to the study of babies with their mothers and it can be said, was an early prime mover in the field. My book evolved through interweaving some of Winnicott’s ideas with my experiences as a therapist, combined with my understanding of a musical relationship. Music can allow us to express ourselves in so many ways that words may not.


Alison Levinge, PHD, LGSM(MT), Cert.Ed., is a music therapy practitioner and researcher. She specializes in music therapy with children experiencing early developmental difficulties and issues relating to bereavement. She teaches and lectures internationally and is based in Bristol, UK. Read more on her book The Music of Being or order your copy here.

A sneak peek into Luna’s Red Hat

It is spring. Luna is in the park, wearing her Mum’s red hat. The sun is shining, but today is not a day for feeling sunny: it was a year ago today that Luna’s mum committed suicide. Fear, anger, and guilt are just some of the emotions that Luna is coping with. Luckily, her Dad is there to help Luna with her emotions and questions.


An extract from Luna's Red Hat

An extract from Luna’s Red Hat

Emmi Smid is a children’s book author and illustrator. She was born in the Netherlands but currently lives and works in Brighton, UK. Emmi wrote Luna’s Red Hat for her cousins, who would have wanted to have a book like this when they were younger.