The Recovery Letters: Addressed to People Experiencing Depression

James Withey, a trained counsellor who worked in social care for 20 years, was diagnosed with clinical depression, attempted suicide and spent time in psychiatric hospital and crisis services where he developed the idea for The Recovery Letters. He met Olivia Sagan, Head of Psychology & Sociology at Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, and a chartered psychologist and former counsellor, when she contacted him directly as she had seen The Recovery Letters website. Both keen to work together to do the book, and with the mix of academic backgrounds and personal experiences in mental health, it was a great match. 

In 2012, The Recovery Letters was launched to host a series of letters online written by people recovering from depression, addressed to those currently affected by a mental health condition. Addressed to ‘Dear You’, the inspirational and heartfelt letters provided hope and support to those experiencing depression and were testament that recovery was possible.

Below are two letters from the book:

Read letter one here

Read letter two here

 


If you would like to read more articles like this and hear the latest news and offers on our books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer. You can unsubscribe at any time.

What can teachers and parents do to help children experiencing loneliness?

child lonelinessChild loneliness and its effect upon emotional wellbeing is becoming an increasingly explored topic, as shown by recent NSPCC and Child Line campaigns. But what can teachers and parents do to support children who are feeling lonely? And how can we help children to understand the difference between healthy solitude and loneliness?

In this extract from Julian Stern’s Can I tell you about Loneliness?, we met Jan, aged 11. Jan tells us about some of the things that can cause him to feel lonely. He explains what it means to feel lonely, and discusses therapeutic ways of alleviating this difficult emotion.

Read the extract

If you would like read more articles like Jan’s and hear the latest news and offers on our Education books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer. You can unsubscribe at any time. You may also be interested in liking our Special Educational, PSHE and Early Years Resources Facebook page.

6 Top tips on how to facilitate good interaction with older adults

top-tips-facilitate-good-interaction-older-adults

Robin Dynes, author of ‘Positive Communication: Activities to reduce isolation and improve the wellbeing of older adults’ provides some tips you can use to help facilitate good interaction with older adults and create a friendly environment

 

  1. Take any health and cultural issues into account

Age related health problems such as the onset of dementia, hearing loss, speech problems and the effects of medications can complicate understanding and the ability to communicate. Be aware of any difficulties individuals may have and take these into account. Make adjustments to any activities to allow for different mental and physical abilities. Even in today’s enlightened age many older adults, and, indeed, young people, have difficulty reading and writing. Find out all you can about the person you are supporting and adjust your communication methods to suit. This includes learning about their cultural background and what is or is not acceptable to them when communicating. For example, in some cultures it is disrespectful for younger people to make direct eye contact with an older person. In this instance it may be prudent to sit slightly to one side, keeping your eyes lowered but so the person can see your expressions, rather than facing the older person when talking.

 

  1. Use simple direct language

Avoid complex sentences. Simple sentences are easier to understand if the person has hearing or cognitive deficits. Express complicated thoughts or instructions in short sentences. Be patient, pause briefly between sentences and allow time for the person to take in what you are saying. Be prepared to repeat what the person has missed. Literal language is easier to understand than idioms or metaphors. Express one idea and message at a time and keep them in a logical order. For example: ‘We will go for a walk now. Later, we can have tea.’ Is better than ‘We’ll have tea when we come back from our walk.’ Use direct questions: ‘Did you bake a cake this morning?’ rather than ‘What did you do this morning?’ The more precise you are, the less difficulty the person will have understanding. The challenge is to simplify your language without talking down or being patronising.

 

  1. Speak clearly and make eye contact

Take care to articulate your words and speak clearly. Pronounce each word carefully rather than mumble or slur your speech. Look directly at the person’s face. Adjust your volume and pace, adapting it to the needs of the person. There is a temptation to shout if the person has hearing difficulties or when repeating something to emphasis what you are saying. But remember there is a difference between speaking clearly and shouting. Shouting is disrespectful and shows your impatience, speaking clearly at a suitable volume and pace shows respect.

 

  1. Watch your non-verbal communication

Be aware of your body language. A tense, worried or impatient expression will communicate anger, impatience or frustration even when speaking in a calm voice. A calm, relaxed speaking style will help keep the focus on the conversation without making the person feel anxious. A high-pitched voice usually communicates stress and a slightly lower pitch will help you sound relaxed. Make your facial expression match the message you are communicating.    

 

  1. Be a good listener

Older people often need time to retrieve a word they are looking for or to express what they want to say. Rather than supplying words, give the person time to think of their own expression or find another way of saying what they want. Not always easy to do, especially if you are busy. Remember, nobody likes to be interrupted or have words put into their mouth. Also avoid calling attention to any verbal mistakes the person makes by correcting them. If you have understood what is being said let the wrong words pass by. Observe the person’s tone of voice, facial expression and body language to help you interpret what they are saying. Check that you have understood correctly. For example ‘Am I right in thinking that you would like ….’

 

  1. Choose a suitable environment

Older adults often find busy environments with background noise difficult. It makes it hard to concentrate and difficult to hear what is being said. Eliminate background distractions including the radio and TV. Choose a quiet space for your activity or conversation. Make sure you have the person or group’s attention and they are not focused on completing another task.

 

Finally, not all older people have hearing or other communication problems. Many have very good mental and physical health and communicate without any difficulties. Use only methods which are appropriate to each situation and person.

 

Robin Dynes is a counsellor and freelance writer who has worked as a Social Inclusion Officer for Skills and Learning. Robin developed an outreach curriculum to meet the needs of people with disabilities, older people and other vulnerable people.

 

If you would like to read more articles like Robin’s and hear the latest news and offers on our books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer. You can unsubscribe at any time.

The importance of positive communication for older adults

positive-communication-older-adultsRobin Dynes, author ofPositive Communication: Activities to reduce isolation and improve the wellbeing of older adultsexplains the reasoning behind his book.

We belong to an ageing society. The National Institute on Ageing informs us that in 2010, an estimated 524 million people were aged 65 or older – 8% of the world’s population.  By 2050, this is expected to increase to 16% – 1.5 billion. A massive challenge for all health, social and care service staff to meet their needs.

As people grow older confidence and self-esteem may be eroded by hearing or sight loss. They are often affected by illness or physical inability to get about and consequently become isolated and lonely. Changes to personal relationships destroy habitual communication patterns and links. Social expectations, shaped by peers and the events and experiences of their time, are out of tune with modern attitudes and the support services are provided by younger people with a different outlook on life. A youth orientated society often makes them feel unimportant, inadequate, isolated and obsolete. Feelings with which I am very familiar, having worked in health, social and care services for over 35 years and as I, and many of my friends, grow older.

It is a fact that older adults who maintain their communication skills and continue to interact socially maintain a more positive view about themselves and are more adept at facing these challenges. They are more able to cope with changes, communicate their feelings, express opinions and wishes and continue to contribute to the society in which they live. They are more likely to retain good physical and emotional wellbeing and maintain a sense of control and achievement in the modern world. Enabling this to happen is essential work in an ageing population.

It is vital that staff within residential homes, drop-in or day centres, hospices, clubs for the elderly, hospitals, nursing homes or support situations, at home with carers help them retain their abilities and wellbeing. We, as activity organisers, group leaders and care workers, are at the forefront of this task. The aim of the book is to provide activities that are easy to use and enables group leaders to achieve this goal.

There are activities to help older adults:

  • Interact and connect with others
  • Retain a positive view of themselves
  • Communicate their feelings , needs, opinions and wishes for the future
  • Talk about and cope with difficult situations
  • Maintain a sense of self control and achievement
  • Meet emotional and spiritual needs
  • Maintain relationships with others
  • Improve their self-esteem and well-being

I hope this book will provide you with an essential tool to aid you to make an impact on the lives, health and wellbeing of the people you support. It is a challenging, enjoyable and rewarding task.

Click here to see an example of some activities included in the book.

Robin Dynes is a counsellor and freelance writer who has worked as a Social Inclusion Officer for Skills and Learning. Robin developed an outreach curriculum to meet the needs of people with disabilities, older people and other vulnerable people.

 

If you would like to read more articles like Robin’s and hear the latest news and offers on our books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Anorexia and Obesity: Two of a Kind?

anorexia Dr Nicola Davies is a health psychologist, counsellor, and writer specialising in raising awareness about health, wellbeing and weight loss. She is a member of the British Psychological Society and the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy. Nicola also keeps a health psychology blog and runs an online forum for counsellors. She is the author of I Can Beat Obesity! and I Can Beat Anorexia! and the co-author of the Eating Disorder Recovery Handbook.

While generally regarded as two separate, very different issues, anorexia and obesity actually share many similarities – not only in terms of risk factors, but also psychological, behavioural, cognitive, genetic, and neuropsychological similarities.

Continue reading

The Use of Play in Therapy

playDr Fiona Zandt has written the below article on the importance of play in therapy. Dr Fiona Zandt and Dr Suzanne Barrett, authors of Creative Ways to Help Children Manage BIG Feelings, are clinical psychologists who currently work in successful private practices in Melbourne. They each have over 15 years’ experience working with children and families. 

Connecting families with wool – Why play is so important when working therapeutically with children

A therapist recently described using an activity from our book that involves using wool to connect family members to make visible the ways in which their feelings and actions impact upon each other. Following the session the child who was being brought to therapy articulated some of what she had learnt to her Mum. She said that she now knew that if she died, everyone would be really sad, and that not everything was her fault. Her comments reflected some key messages that the therapist wanted to convey – namely that she was part of a family who cared about her and were all being affected by the difficulties they were experiencing. Blame was removed and the responsibility for change was shared, laying the foundation for the therapist to work effectively with both the parents and the child.

Continue reading

Sign up for the latest Social Work Adults Catalogue and Children and Families Catalogue

catalogue

Sign up to our mailing list to receive a free copy of our latest Social Work Catalogue for Children and Families and our Social Work Catalogue for Adults.

To request a free print copy of JKP’s complete catalogue of books on Social Work, sign up to our mailing list below. Be sure to click any additional areas of interest so we can notify you about exciting new titles you might like.

By completing the form below you are signing up to our mailing list, but you may unsubscribe at any time.






































Borderline Personality Disorder: One Step at a Time

Tracy Barker, author of A Sad and Sorry State of Disorder, is an expert by experience on how to live with and manage borderline personality disorder (BPD), now a happily married home maker committed to raising awareness of BPD, she has written an emotional and honest piece on how it feels to have BPD, the struggles and how to deal with it; one step at a time.

One step, then take a break –
a few days, to recover.
One step, then rest
before embarking on another.

Continue reading

Peace Inside: How meditation can transform your mental health

peaceSam Settle, editor of Peace Inside, examines how the time tested practice of meditation – sitting in silence and paying attention to the breath – is helping people maintain a healthy mind behind bars.

“If you don’t go into prison with a mental health problem, then you’re very likely to pick one up while you’re there. And if you do have a pre-existing condition – and many people who come into prison do – it’s probably going to get worse while you’re inside.” So said the head of the mental health team at an Oxfordshire prison, speaking recently to yoga teachers at a training run by our charity, the Prison Phoenix Trust (PPT). Part of the PPT’s work is setting up yoga and meditation classes in prisons, training and supporting qualified teachers for this unusual work. There are currently 144 classes in 79 UK and Irish prisons.

Continue reading

Counsellors working with young people often find it can feel like messy, complex work. What helps when counsellors are stuck?

counsellorNick Luxmoore, author of Practical Supervision for Counsellors who Work with Young People, explores the positive impact that good supervision sessions can have on counsellors who are struggling to break down barriers with young people in their care.

It’s Nikki’s first day as a counsellor and she’s about to see four young people. “Help!” she says, panicking. “What am I supposed to do?” Elsewhere, the girl Stephanie’s been seeing for counselling has ripped up a box of tissues and stormed out of the room, Marvin’s complaining that his counselling waiting list is getting longer and longer, and all the young people at Maggie’s school appear to be cutting themselves or feeling suicidal….

However experienced or inexperienced they may be, all professional counsellors are obliged to have regular meetings with a supervisor: someone with whom they can untangle the “stuckness” that develops in their thinking and relationships. Most are only too glad of the facility and most counsellors are able to choose their supervisor, someone who may or may not already have experience of working with young people. Continue reading