Simon Faulkner’s 2018 Rhythm2Recovery USA Tour

Simon Faulkner, author of Rhythm to Recovery, will be holding three workshops in the US in April! Learn how to utilize rhythm and reflection in both therapeutic and educational settings and familiarize yourself with a model of practice that has a proven track record for social and emotional development. For anyone interested in fun, interactive rhythmic exercises to use with both individuals and groups, this is the workshop for you.

For more information and to register, visit:

American Rhythm2Recovery Workshop 2018 (10) (002)

Making therapeutic board games with kids

feelings

Dr Fiona Zandt and Dr Suzanne Barrett, authors of Creative Ways to Help Children Manage BIG Feelings, are clinical psychologists who currently work in successful private practices in Melbourne. They each have over 15 years’ experience working with children and families. 

Spider Squash, Temper Trail, Goodbye Worry Monster, and Beat the Anger Volcano are some of the board games we’ve created to help children with emotional difficulties. Board games are a great thing to make in therapy with children. While there are a number of excellent therapeutic board games on the market, making your own allows you to personalise them to meet the needs of the child you are working with. You can incorporate their interests and reflect on their individual strengths. Children often talk much more freely when engaged in play and the process of making the game together provides the opportunity for many helpful discussions. They require few materials, can readily be taken home, and are easily adapted for use with children with a wide range of emotional issues. Perhaps most importantly though making board games is fun.

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Sign up to receive our new Music Therapy Catalogue

catalogue

Sign up to our mailing list to receive a free copy of our latest Music Therapy Catalogue of new and bestselling books 2018.

To request a free print copy of the JKP complete catalogue of books on Music Therapy, sign up to our mailing list below. Be sure to click any additional areas of interest so we can notify you about exciting new titles you might like.

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Download example activities for psychotherapeutic work

psychotherapeutic

Suitable for adults and young people, The Art Activity Book for Psychotherapeutic Work will help clients to raise self-esteem, cope with change and adversity, and manage complex emotions with 100 ready-to-use illustrated worksheets and activities. Here we share 7 example worksheets.

Drawing on psychotherapeutic approaches including cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), these worksheets are ideal for use in therapeutic work, for starting conversations and addressing problems that clients face. Each worksheet is designed to encourage clients to express their thoughts and emotions creatively in a relaxed way. The book also includes activities that centre on visual diary keeping, to help clients gain perspective on their unique issues and learn to solve their problems in a positive, healthy way.

Jennifer Guest is a clinical supervisor and counsellor for Relate, a charity that provides counselling services, and has her own private practice in Yorkshire.

Click here to download some examples 

Art Therapy in Private Practice: Editing a Book as Research

Art Therapy Private PracticeThis blog is based on a speech delivered by author James D. West at the launch of the book Art Therapy in Private Practice on the 7th October 2017 at London Art Therapy Centre.

I have learnt a lot through the researching process of editing this book but the most important thing I have learnt has been to understand the centrality of storytelling in our practices. Telling the story, and trying to get it right!

In exploring the question ‘What Art Therapy in Private Practice is?’ we have told stories and spoken of the larger narratives that inform our work to reveal some of the peculiarities and virtues of our world.

As I was looking back at my emails I was surprised to discover this project began four years ago in late 2013 when Gary Nash and I formed the initial proposal for the book with some of the authors here, but at the old site of London Art Therapy Centre in Archway.  It was two years later that we found a publisher and began to write in earnest. We had regular authors’ meetings and developed the Mind Map to help us to focus on the broad themes that we discovered to be the central concerns of our practices.

This ongoing dialogue helped us to set each chapter in the broader context of these concerns more consistently. The book became a collaborative research document as the authors drew out the central themes that formed and reformed the Mind Map which, like a sort of conceptual squid, kept moving around its tentacles.

art therapy private practice

The Mind Map

The book also reflects the work of the British Association of Art Therapist’s Private Practice Special Interest Group (BAAT PPSIG), set up by Gary Nash and Amanda Wright in 2008 and which I currently coordinate. It continues to offer a network for art therapy private practitioners across the UK.

BAAT Council’s support and sponsorship of the Special Interest Group (SIG) is represented in the book. The BAAT ‘Core Skills and Practice Standards in Private Work’ appears in the Appendices and BAAT also provided background support, making available the research officer to answer some of our pressing research questions, and also in offering us anonymised peer review through the Dual Experience Group.

In the Appendices you can also see a copy of the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy Practice Research Network’s (UKCP PRN) ‘Moments of Meeting’ questionnaire as evidence of broader professional alliances.

In the book we also reflected on the learning that had occurred in the SIG meetings held in Sheffield, Manchester, and Wales over the last six years.

What gradually became very clear is that different practices in different contexts evolve different ways of knowing. In the book I have called this contextual epistemology.  We certainly didn’t always agree in the author’s group and I now see these tensions as a vital signs of the activity of real learning.  The overarching process however showed how a group of professionals, and their clients, can usefully work together to create representative stories from sometimes very different contexts, revealing both their shared and divergent ideas, yet slowly building a rich and lively picture of what we do.

Within art therapy in the UK there has been considerable suspicion about the standards and objectives of art therapy in private practice. We aimed to address these issues directly.  Consequently I believe we have gone a considerable way to create a fuller, and fairer, picture of our practice in this area.

Returning once more to stories… Now that we have begun to represent where we are and how we got here, we can look forward and ask ‘What will become of art therapy in private practice?’ and you will see from the book that we have better reasons, than we initially thought, to be optimistic.

I am now busily trying to ease the passage of the book to its readers and this has become the next exciting episode!  My hope is that all the sincere and heartfelt work that has gone into these chapters will shine through and be recognised, appreciated, enjoyed and used by its readers, providing a fresh and inspiring perspective at this crucial and testing time.

James D. West 3.10.17

 

James D. West is an art therapist in private practice. He is a peer reviewer for the International Journal of Art Therapy and coordinator of the BAAT Private Practice Special Interest Group.

Geoff Mead on loss, the grieving process and Gone in the Morning

Geoff MeadGeoff Mead took some time to reflect on the grieving process and some of the themes of his new book

Watch the full 28 minute interview below, or alternatively watch a series of short clips from the interview in the playlist below that.

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Sign up to receive our new Art Therapy Catalogue

catalogueSign up to our mailing list to receive a free copy of our latest Art Therapy Catalogue of new and bestselling titles 2017.

To request a free print copy of the JKP complete catalogue of books on Art Therapy, sign up to our mailing list below. Be sure to click any additional areas of interest so we can notify you about exciting new titles you might like.

By completing the form below you are signing up to our mailing list, but you may unsubscribe at any time.

 


































Creative extensions of the safe place exercise

creativeKaren Treisman, author of A Therapeutic Treasure Box for Working with Children and Adolescents with Developmental Trauma: Creative Techniques and Activities, is a specialist clinical psychologist, trainer, and author. She is also the Director of Safe Hands and Thinking Minds Training and Consultancy services. In this blog post, she explores the different ways a therapist can create a safe place for children.

One of the common tools in a therapist’s tool box is the imaginary safe place exercise. This can be a great way to support children, adolescents, parents, and ourselves to have an emotional safe haven and an inner place of safety.

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Book launch: Portrait Therapy by Susan M. D. Carr

Portrait Therapy

After all the long hours sat at the computer writing this book, it is wonderful to be preparing for the book launch of Portrait Therapy on Thursday 28th September!
I will be taking along some of the portraits that feature in the book, so if you missed my “Paint me this way!” exhibition at Swindon Museum and Art Gallery, this will be a chance to see some of them. There will be signed books to purchase, free drinks and nibbles, and there is free parking too! Stanton Park (SN6 7SF) is one of Swindon’s best kept secrets, a beautiful place to visit, so arrive early for a walk around the park and lake before the event! I look forward to welcoming you.
To find out more about portrait therapy check out my website: www.portraittherapy.co.uk

Portrait Therapy

To find out more about Susan’s book, Portrait Therapy, click here.

If you would like to keep up to date with our latest news and offers on our art therapy books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer, and you may unsubscribe at any time. 

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The Use of Play in Therapy

playDr Fiona Zandt has written the below article on the importance of play in therapy. Dr Fiona Zandt and Dr Suzanne Barrett, authors of Creative Ways to Help Children Manage BIG Feelings, are clinical psychologists who currently work in successful private practices in Melbourne. They each have over 15 years’ experience working with children and families. 

Connecting families with wool – Why play is so important when working therapeutically with children

A therapist recently described using an activity from our book that involves using wool to connect family members to make visible the ways in which their feelings and actions impact upon each other. Following the session the child who was being brought to therapy articulated some of what she had learnt to her Mum. She said that she now knew that if she died, everyone would be really sad, and that not everything was her fault. Her comments reflected some key messages that the therapist wanted to convey – namely that she was part of a family who cared about her and were all being affected by the difficulties they were experiencing. Blame was removed and the responsibility for change was shared, laying the foundation for the therapist to work effectively with both the parents and the child.

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