Summer Holiday activites for younger children with Autism and other learning difficulties (Day 5).

This one probably requires a trip to the local arts store but will provide hours of possibilities and fun once it’s mixed together.

GLOWING WATER

In just a few steps we can turn basic tap water into buckets of fluorescent fun.

Here’s all you need

  • Water
  • A container
  • NON-TOXIC fluorescent paint
  • Backlight bulb

GO!
1. Add a few tablespoons of fluorescent paint in any color into very warm or hot water:

2. stir until completely mixed

3. add as much water as you’d like to increase the volume, stopping before the glow is too diluted.

 

You’ve got the base for glow-in-the-dark water balloons.

And that’s IT! Now get glowing!

 

Taken from The Asperkid’s Game Plan by Jennifer Cook O’Toole

Drawing your family as animals – activity from How to Get Kids Offline, Outdoors and Connecting with Nature

In this extract, you can try several different activities based on drawing family members metaphorically. For the younger children, this may be a case of drawing the family as people and this should still be encouraged despite not being within the guidelines of the activity! Older children may enjoy the chance to be creative by taking characteristics of the family members and representing them in animals and types of water.

Thomas_How-to-Get-Kids_978-1-84905-968-8_colourjpg-print

read the extract…

For more great activities to keep children stimulated and active, see Bonnie Thomas’ How to Get Kids Offline, Outdoors and Connecting with Nature.

Summer Holiday activites for younger children with Autism and other learning difficulties (Day 1).

We realise the importance of keeping children occupied over the summer holidays and with that in mind will be featuring a different activity that you can do with your kids every day this week. These will be interesting, low-cost activities for parents with younger children – first up today is a drawing exercise that can involve the whole family (including the family pet).

 

MIRROR DRAWING

Primary learning focus

  • Auditory perception, visual-motor integration

Materials needed

  • Paper and markers or crayons
  • File folder or other object to use as a visual barrier

Description

In this game, the child attempts to draw a picture that looks the same as the adult’s picture, given only auditory clues. The adult and child each have paper and drawing materials. Place the file folder or other barrier in between the child and the adult, so they cannot see each other’s paper. The adult then draws one item at a time, giving a verbal direction for the child to do the same thing. For example, the adult might say “Draw a large square in the center of the paper, with a small circle inside the square. Next make a smiley face in the top left hand corner of the paper.” After several directions, remove the barrier and compare the two pictures, discussing how they are different or similar. Let the child take turns being the one to give directions to the adult.

Variations

  • Use lined paper and give directions to copy sequences to encourage memory skills (for example, “Let’s draw circles to make this pattern: red, blue, green, red, blue, green”)
  • While shapes and colors are easier to describe, this game is also fun when you make it more creative. For example, give directions for drawing the family pet, but add silly directions, like making a green tongue, or wearing dog mittens.
  • Draw while lying on your belly, or at a vertical surface to strengthen upper body skills.

 

As featured in Simple Low-Cost Games and Activities for Sensorimotor Learning by Lisa A. Kurtz

Reconnecting, establishing safety, empowerment with humour – extract from ‘Unpack my Heart with Words’ By Marion Baraitser

In this extract, Marion Baraitser provides activities for both younger and older children in order to explore their feelings of safety and the importance of humour.
‘Reading and expressive writing with traumatised children, young refugees and asylum seekers – Unpack my heart with words’ is available now from the JKP website. 

Baraitser_Reading-and-Exp_978-1-84905-384-6_colourjpg-printYoung adults’ group

Reconnecting, establishing safety, empowerment with humour

1. Read aloud together Sholem Aleichem’s story On Account of a
Hat (1953). It is about a young man from the shtetl returning
home on a train anxious not to be late for his wife’s celebratory
dinner, who finds to his horror that he has by mistake picked
up the hat of the important official sitting next to him on thestation. Everyone treats him with a deference entirely false to
him. He is forced to return to the station, replace the hat and
arrive home late for dinner, to an enraged wife.

2. Ask the group to talk about their own humorous incidences of
frustration within their everyday lives that involve their need for
finding a safe place.

3. Write about stories they know about how to face dangerous
and frustrating situations realistically, and how to find workable
solutions that give a measure of empowerment.

4. Read these aloud and share.

5. Enact them.

Young children’s group

1. As a warm-up, pass an endearing stuffed animal around the
group, with each child saying how they are feeling and what
they would like to talk about.

2. Create a safe place in the room and ask them to create a pose,
then tap each person to ask them to show and tell the group
what their space looks like, what it contains and what they are
doing there.

3. Ask each person to make sculptures, using ‘characters’ that
threaten them. Then ask them to step away and make changes,
telling their feelings to the group. Or they may create a wax
museum containing characters from their past that reflect their
feelings and situations about a theme such as anger or hate and
the others can walk through it.

4. Enact these ‘characters’. The rest of the group should question them.
Write stories about them.[AQ]

I was on my mettle – after a lifetime spent with literature, I needed to sift and sort the books I knew that were of great truth and impact, to find appropriate texts that applied to, or transformed, traumatised young people’s problems in a way they could absorb and use them effectively. This meant trawling through not only English literature, but also world literature in translation.

‘Reading and expressive writing with traumatised children, young refugees and asylum seekers – Unpack my heart with words’ is available now from the JKP website. 

Request a free copy of the new Art Therapy catalogue

Art therapy cat coverSign up to request your free copy of our latest brochure of new and bestselling books on Art Therapy.

This includes information on our new and bestselling titles such as ‘Mindfulness and the Arts Therapies’ by Laury Rappaport and ‘Using Art Therapy with Diverse Populations’ by Paula Howie. This range includes practical books for professionals, manuals on how to incorporate creative approaches into practice as well as guides for individuals who are themselves affected.                                                                         

To receive a free copy of the catalogue, please sign up for our mailing list and we’ll get one out to you right away. You may also request multiple copies to share with friends, family, colleagues and clients–simply note how many copies you would like (up to 20) in the ‘any additional comments’ box on the sign-up form.

We hope you will take advantage of this opportunity to get more information about our outstanding new titles such as ‘Presence and Process in Expressive Arts Work’ by Herbert Eberhart. The catalogue also features information on bestselling titles such as ‘A Guide to Research Ethics for Art Therapists & Health Practitioners’ by Camilla Farrant and ‘The Expressive Arts Activity Book: A Resource for Professionals’ by Suzanne Darley.

Click this link to see a listing of new and recent titles from Jessica Kingsley Publishers’ Art Therapy list.

To request a copy of the JKP complete catalogue of books on Art Therapy, please click here to fill out our sign-up sheet. Please be sure to click any additional areas of interest as well. You should receive a copy of the catalogue within two weeks.

Mindful art-making with adolescents

anger imageIn this extract taken from Mindfulness and the Arts Therapies, edited by Laury Rappaport, Pat B. Allen introduces the way in which mindfulness is incorporated into the Open Studio Process, and describes the challenges and rewards of using this process with a group of adolescent boys. She explains her own reaction when the boys were invited to provide their own music for the art-making portion of a session, and how she found she could rely on the creative process as a positive form of support.

Read the extract here

 

Incorporating creativity in supervision

Chesner-Zografo_Creative-Superv_978-1-84905-316-7_colourjpg-print Anna Chesner, co-author of Creative Supervision Across Modalities, explains why using creativity in supervision sessions can benefit both the supervisor and supervisee, and gives her top tips for any therapist or helping professional new to using this approach.

Why is the use of creativity so effective in supervision sessions?
Creativity helps to link right brain and left brain understanding of practice. Often as practitioners we may have a feeling of stuckness, or going round in circles. Using creative methods helps us to facilitate new perspectives and fresh energy.

How can creative supervision ensure that a fresh perspective is maintained in supervision sessions, and how does this benefit the supervisor and supervisee?
Creative supervision can bring a new perspective and fresh energy to reflecting on our clinical or other professional practice. This in term can bring fresh energy and clarity to our sessions with clients. If supervision itself lacks vitality it may become part of the problem, rather than facilitating possible solutions.

In chapters 2 and 3 of your new book you write about the importance of roles in creative supervision – why is this? Which of the roles you mention do you think it is most difficult for a new supervisor to take on? Is there one that they tend to slip into more easily?
Not so much roles as an understanding of role (singular). The concept of role helps us to think about our “way of being” and our clients’ way of being. It is a practical tool for looking at patterns of behaviour and relating. Supervisor’s need an awareness of the multiple roles they may inhabit as a supervisor, and in the best case some role flexibility. Similarly, practitioners from all fields can benefit from thinking about their own roles in their practice, and indeed the roles of their clients within their various systems.

What is the most challenging thing you have to cover with trainee supervisors? What is it that they usually struggle most with in terms of incorporating creativity into sessions?
Supervision trainees have firstly to meet the challenge of getting to grips with the role of supervisor, which is distinct from their more familiar roles as clinician. There is an added challenge in learning how to use creative techniques in a way that is a spontaneous response to the supervisory question or focus and remains firmly within the frame of supervision.

Why is it that ‘irrational’ thinking can be such a crucial part of the creative process?
Not so much irrational as out of awareness, or known only implicitly. Face to face clinical work involves the practitioner in complex, multi-layered interactions, where physical or felt sense, and imagination are as important as the actual words spoken. Our right brain awareness can be brought to light particularly well through creative approaches to supervision.

You mention several times the importance of establishing a clear focus in the supervisory session – why is this?
A clear focus or supervisory question is helpful for a number of reasons. It ensures transparency about what kind of help or reflection opportunity is being sought. It supports a collaborative approach between supervisor and supervisee. It reveals the level at which a supervisee is able to reflect on and articulate their process.

What are the top tips you would give to a supervisor who is new to using creativity in their sessions?
– Reflect on your own interventions in the light of supervision theory
– Bring your creative supervision practice to your own supervision space
– Remain open to new learning
– Undertake training in the use of creative supervision methods

 

New and bestselling books on music therapy

Our latest catalogue of new and bestselling books on Music Therapy is now available to view online, including new titles ‘Music Technology in Therapeutic and Health Settings’ by Wendy Magee, ‘Musical Encounters with Dying’ by Islene Runningdeer, and ‘Mindfulness and the Arts Therapies’ by Laury Rappaport.

You can simply click on any title or cover for more information or to buy.


 

 

How well do you know yourself?

Bolton_Writers-Key_978-1-84905-475-1_colourjpg-webWe make assumptions about ourselves all the time, but how much do we really know?

As Gillie Bolton says in the opening chapter of her new book The Writer’s Key, ‘The simple action of putting words on a page can begin to help us find out what we think, believe and know’.

This exercise taken from the book is a great way to begin to explore ourselves through writing; our worries, our fears, our hopes, and our aspirations.

All you need to have a go is a pen and a piece of paper. You might be surprised by what you discover!

Download the free writing exercise here