The others in music therapy practice

A well-trodden territory in need of a map by John Strange

music therapy practiceYou can learn about music therapy from books, journals, magazine or newspaper articles, TV or radio programmes, websites or blogs. These sources offer plenty of information, both practical and theoretical, about music therapy clients – their problems, what happens in music therapy and how it helps – and about the music therapist herself – what she does and why. There seems to be much less written and said about various others who may also be in the therapy room, despite the fact that their contribution is often crucial to the effectiveness of the therapy. It was this imbalance in the available information about what actually goes on in music therapy which I and my co-editors Professor Helen Odell-Miller and Eleanor Richards set out to correct in our newly published compilation, Collaboration and Assistance in Music Therapy Practice: Roles, Relationships, Challenges.

Although many music therapy approaches draw on theories and practices from the field of psychodynamic therapy, it is relatively uncommon to find in music therapy the classic psychoanalytic model of therapist and patient sharing an exclusive private space. The therapy space must be safely contained by therapeutic ‘boundaries’, but the exclusion of others is seldom either practical or desirable. Nurses, care workers, escorts, teaching assistants, family members may for varying reasons need to be present, and their presence creates not only challenges but opportunities which the therapist would be foolish to ignore. Continue reading

Music Therapy with Families: Defining Music Early Learning Programs (MELPS)

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“Families and Music Early Learning Programs” in Music Therapy with Families: Therapeutic Approaches and Theoretical Perspectives

Music Therapist and Managing Director of Bobbin Babies, Vicky Abad, reflects on how music could support all parents in their everyday parenting and not only those facing complex needs, and talks to us about how, with Professor Margaret S. Barrett, she came to present a working definition of MELP – Music Early Learning Program – in Music Therapy with Families: Therapeutic Approaches and Theoretical Perspectives

Music Early Learning Programs, or MELPs, strengthen parent-child bonds, families and communities.

When I was first approached to write this book chapter I thought there must be a mistake.

My initial response was “I no longer work as a music therapist with families who have complex needs, rather I run a business for families who wish to attend music groups in their community”.

“Yes! That is exactly why we want you to write this chapter in the book” came the reply.

The timing for this chapter was impeccable. My personal journey as a music therapist and my professional journey as a business owner were coalescing in a way that led me into the world of research. But let me explain what I mean. Continue reading

How to utilise rhythm and reflection in both therapeutic and educational settings – Q&A

faulkner-rythmntorecovery-c2wIn our recent release, Rhythm to Recovery, you can discover how to utilise rhythm and reflection in both therapeutic and educational settings to improve well-being. To celebrate the release of Rhythm to Recovery, we caught up with Simon Faulkner to talk all things music therapy and his new book!

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Music Therapy Catalogue 2016 – Sign up to our Mailing List!

 

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Sign up to our mailing list to receive a free copy of our latest brochure of new and bestselling Music Therapy titles.

To request a free print copy of the JKP complete catalogue of books on Music Therapy, sign up to our mailing list below. You can also sign up to receive emails by choosing ‘yes’ in the ‘receive emails’ box. Be sure to click any additional areas of interest so we can notify you about exciting new titles you might like. You should receive a copy of the catalogue within three weeks. You can opt out of our mailings at any time.





































Music Therapy with Families – Q & A

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In our recent release, Music Therapy with Families, international music therapists describe and discuss models of working with families in different clinical areas, from those with family members with dementia or autism, to those in palliative care, psychiatric or paediatric hospital settings. To celebrate the release of Music Therapy with Families, we caught up with Stine Lindhal Jacobsen and Grace Thompson to talk about all things music therapy and their new book!

 

What motivated you to write Music Therapy with Families?

Grace: Back in 2012 I attended the Nordic Congress of Music Therapy in Finland.  There was a round-table presentation where music therapists from different countries shared their approaches to working with families.  It was really exciting to hear about the diverse approaches each music therapist took in their work, and also the variety of populations music therapists were working with.  Many were working with young children, but others were working with families with adolescent children or families where adult children were supporting older parents.  The following year I met my future co-editor Stine Lindahl Jacobsen at the European Music Therapy Congress in Oslo, and soon after she invited me to write a chapter for this book.  I was so excited about the idea, that I enthusiastically offered to help Stine with the editing and she agreed – that was the start of our special connection across opposite sides of the world!

Stine: Ever since I started working with families in 2005 I wanted to develop a theoretically anchored music therapy approach focused on the complex dynamics of families. I kept looking for these in the literature to be inspired and learn from others but only found a few. The idea about the book has long been in my mind and after the foundation of an international network of working with families within music therapy I was really motivated to follow up on the book. I was utterly grateful for Grace Thompson to offer her assistance as co-editor as the job isn’t easily done – and I happily accepted. Our collaboration was pure pleasure – it was really a sensation of sharing the same vision and goal.

 

What do you think it is about music that has the potential to be therapeutic?

Grace: This is a great question, and one that music therapists are asked a lot!  There are different perspectives that you can take when thinking about how music can be therapeutic.  Some people theorise that music making in communities has always been a way for people to socially bond together.  Other academics highlight how music stimulates many parts of the brain at once, making music participation a bit like a full brain work-out! In my work, I align with theories from developmental psychology which highlight how musical play and interactions are part of the earliest forms of social interaction.  Before we could even speak, our caregivers used musical forms to attune to us and try to engage with us.  For children with disabilities who might have various developmental challenges, music therapists create opportunities for musical interplay in order to provide another avenue for social and communication development.  For some children, interacting within music making is more motivating and enjoyable and so they persist with the interaction for longer.  Music making therefore provides a really powerful opportunity to support and promote developmental outcomes. Each author in our book has a different theoretical perspective which they explain in depth in their chapter, so the reader can gain a very broad understanding of how and why music therapy makes an important contribution to people’s lives.

Stine: Big question – and important. For me it is about how music motivates us and draws us in. When you work with people in music you get a sense of them very quickly and they get a sense of you too! There is so much information in musical interaction which guides the music therapist but also the people you work with. For me the musical interaction is genuine and there is an important authentic meeting. You cannot lie in the music. The music can help you contain difficult emotions and aid you to try on new expressions and roles. Using music gives you endless opportunities to flexibly, respectfully and adjustably meet the need of many different clients as the book also illustrates with all its different therapists and clients.

 

It is mentioned in the book that music therapy is gaining popularity as a therapeutic activity. Why do you think this is so?

Grace: Well, in my work as a music therapist with children on the Autism Spectrum, many families comment that music therapy doesn’t feel like therapy.  Instead, they say how much they enjoy the sessions as a parent, and how their child really looks forward to coming.  I think that families really appreciate being able to share a mutually enjoyable experience with their child.  When they see their child playing the instruments, singing and moving to the music, they can also see their child’s strengths.  As a music therapist, I love being able to uncover what the child can do well, and using that as the basis to support further development.

Stine: I also think music therapy is gaining popularity partly because research is growing and building an argument for its use, but also because we as academics are getting better at disseminating the positive effects and complex processes to other disciplines and to the general population.

 

What, in your opinion, is the most challenging aspect of working with families (as opposed to individuals) in music therapy? What is the most rewarding aspect?

Grace: I have worked as a music therapist with families who have young children with disabilities since around 2000. I have always experienced how quickly the children get to know me and how much fun we have together when we are playing music.  But of course, I will only work with the children for a short time in their lives.  It is very rewarding to support parents to join in with the musical play so that they can also experience this sense of fun and connection that can even deepen their parent-child relationship.  However, some parents can be a bit hesitant to join in with the musical play. Our Western society tends to portray music as a specialist activity where you have to be ‘talented’ to make music or sing.  So one of the challenges of the work is encouraging parents to have a go, and sing along even if they don’t feel they are very musical.  I also encourage parents to keep using the songs and musical activities in the home without me, so that they can continue to provide rich developmental opportunities for their child, as well as having a new way to have fun together and strengthen relationship.

Stine: It can be very challenging to form healthy working alliances when working with families with emotionally neglected children. The aim is to make the family work better together and have no need of therapy. There is always a risk that as a therapist you might take over, or overshadow the parents, or bond more with one family member than another. However, the challenge and hard work is worth every second when you get to experience the empowerment of parents and children through music – when you get to see families grow closer, bond stronger and interact better.

 

What are you hoping readers take away from the book?

Grace: I hope our community will really understand what music therapy has to offer people with various disabilities and health challenges.  I would love to see families including more music making in their daily lives, sharing joyful moments together with music, and supporting their children and loved ones to be the best they can be. I also hope that music therapists and music therapy students will be inspired by the different case examples and feel more confident to work with families in music therapy.

Stine: I hope music therapists in all forms will find inspiration and knowledge about working with families in music therapy. Interdisciplinary colleagues working with or interested in working with families might also get inspired or get to understand the work of their own colleagues. The book can be relevant to anyone interested in how music can connect to the lives of various families and their special needs, resources and challenges.

 

To buy the book or find out more about it please visit here.

Ten Things I Have Learnt as a Sex and Relationship Therapist – by Juliet Grayson

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We spoke to the author of ‘Landscapes of the Heart‘, Juliet Grayson, about what she has learnt in her years as a couples therapist. She shares ten fascinating insights below.

For more information on the book, or to buy your own copy, just follow this link!

Here are ten things that I have learnt as a sex and relationship therapist.  I’m in the very privileged position, as a couples therapist, to get a real insight into the lives of other people.  I probably know some aspects of my clients better than anyone else.  I also get an amazing view of how people think about sex and relationships.  When I see people for a session on their own, there is no point in them lying.  They share how they really think about intimacy, lovemaking and their partner.

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Sign up for the Autism Movement Therapy® April 2016 UK workshops

LARA-Bowers_Autism-Movement_978-1-84905-728-8_colourjpg-printFounder of Autism Movement Therapy® Inc. Joanne Lara will be in the UK this April to run AMT® certification workshops that will be open to ALL. With no dance experience required to participate the author of Autism Movement Therapy® Method: Waking up the Brain! will guide attendees through this unique program that outlines the functions of the brain specifically pertinent to individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and shows how music and independent movement can help strengthen the body and brain connection. This practical and positive programme will give all comers the techniques needed to use AMT® effectively in a range of environments and will provide all who complete the course with a certificate.

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MOON BALLOON JOURNEYS

Moon BalloonAuthor Joan Drescher, A Journey in the Moon Balloon: When Images Speak Louder than Words, shares highlights from her home in Hingham, Massachussets after a wonderful trip to the 2015 International Hot Air Balloon Fiesta in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

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Join our mailing list to receive your free copy of our latest Music Therapy books catalogue.

2015 - Music Therapy Catalogue- cover

Sign up to our mailing list to receive a free copy of our latest brochure of new and bestselling Music Therapy titles.

To request a free print copy of the JKP complete catalogue of books on Music Therapy, sign up to our mailing list below. You can also sign up to receive emails by choosing ‘yes’ in the ‘receive emails’ box. Be sure to click any additional areas of interest so we can notify you about exciting new titles you might like. You should receive a copy of the catalogue within three weeks. You can opt out of our mailings at any time.