Download free sample pages from the Artistic Autistic Colouring Book

Wonderfully detailed and obsessively precise, Artistic Autistic calls out to the perfectionist in all of us. Straight from the pen of Peter Myers, an artist with Asperger’s Syndrome, these delightfully complex illustrations reveal the exacting nature of an Asperger mind. Can you match Peter’s detailed drawings with your own meticulous colouring?

Artistic Autistic

As part of our JKP Advent season, we’re offering you the chance to download free sample pages from the book, to enjoy colouring in at home this Christmas.

Click HERE to begin download.

Enter a world of order, detail and precision through every page of this extraordinary colouring book. Providing a mesmerizing snapshot into the creative world of autism through the mind of Peter Myers, an artist with Asperger’s Syndrome, the book includes an introduction by the artist along with a collection of pen and ink illustrations ready to be brought to life.

Letting his imagination inspire his creativity, Peter’s artwork captures perfectly his constantly changing and shifting ideas, down to the very last millimetre. Add your personal stamp to these beautifully complex drawings and let your own exacting nature express itself.

Creative Ways to Help Children Manage BIG Feelings

Help children to stay on top of “big” feelings like anger, sadness and anxiety with this ingeniously easy-to-use therapy toolkit, Creative Ways to Help Children Manage BIG Feelings. Focusing on making therapy for children both purposeful and playful, the book provides 47 activities to transform your sessions using everyday materials and a variety of tried-and-tested therapy models. We have provided three downloadable examples of these activities below for you to try.

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Autism: A Journey of Discovery as a Parent and Psychologist

Raelene Dundon is a parent, a psychologist and the author of  Talking with Your Child about Their Autism Diagnosis: A Guide for Parents. In this piece, Raelene tells her personal story of how she came to write this book, and what she hopes it will achieve. You can also read an edited extract from the book on our blog, here

Looking back on where this book really started, I would have to say that it was 10 years in the making. It was about 10 years ago that my son Aaron was diagnosed with Autism, and I was launched into a world of speech therapy, behavioural intervention, visual supports and questions – lots of questions.

parent autism

I was already a registered Psychologist at the time, and had been working with children with Autism and other developmental disabilities in an early intervention program in Melbourne, Australia. While with hindsight I can honestly say that my experience of being a parent to a child with Autism has been a challenging but overwhelmingly positive one, I can still remember the moment I was told that Aaron had Autism and my reaction was one I have since seen many other parents go through – fear, sadness, and confusion.

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An interview with Debbie Garvey, early years education expert

Debbie Garvey

Hi Debbie, thank you for agreeing to answer some questions about your new book, and indeed on your growing collection of early years titles! What can readers expect from Nurturing Personal, Social and Emotional Development in Early Childhood and how does it differ from your previous work?

Well, I suppose the first major difference is that this book is about children, whereas the other books are about staff. This was always the book I wanted to write, it just took a little time to come to fruition, and I am so glad it did. The time in between first thinking about the PSED book, and starting to write it, meant time to develop ideas, read more research and really plan what themes I wanted to explore.

Another difference is perhaps that this book is a little more controversial as Dr Suzanne Zeedyk warns in the foreword, “It’s going to be a bit of a bumpy ride.” I didn’t set out to be controversial – I simply hope that practitioners will maybe think about things in a slightly different way. So, for example, I’ve asked readers to consider how we approach Christmas, Graduations and behaviours, and imagine being a young child in those situations. Often, putting ourselves in a young child’s shoes  allows us to see things in a very different way.

Who would you say your books would be most useful for, and what have you done to maximise their practicality? Continue reading

Download example activities for psychotherapeutic work

psychotherapeutic

Suitable for adults and young people, The Art Activity Book for Psychotherapeutic Work will help clients to raise self-esteem, cope with change and adversity, and manage complex emotions with 100 ready-to-use illustrated worksheets and activities. Here we share 7 example worksheets.

Drawing on psychotherapeutic approaches including cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), these worksheets are ideal for use in therapeutic work, for starting conversations and addressing problems that clients face. Each worksheet is designed to encourage clients to express their thoughts and emotions creatively in a relaxed way. The book also includes activities that centre on visual diary keeping, to help clients gain perspective on their unique issues and learn to solve their problems in a positive, healthy way.

Jennifer Guest is a clinical supervisor and counsellor for Relate, a charity that provides counselling services, and has her own private practice in Yorkshire.

Click here to download some examples 

Happiness & Positive Psychology for Young People with Autism – author Q&A

Victoria Honeybourne is a senior advisory teacher, trainer and writer with a particular interest in promoting wellbeing amongst young people on the autism spectrum. We caught up with Victoria upon the publication of her latest book, A Practical Guide to Happiness in Children and Teens on the Autism Spectrumto ask a few questions about how it came about. 

happiness autism

What motivated you to write A Practical Guide to Happiness in Children and Teens on the Autism Spectrum and who is the book for?

There has been a lot of interest recently in using findings from the positive psychology movement to improve happiness, wellbeing and resilience in children and young people.  However, I realised that many of the strategies advised were not always the most appropriate for those on the autism spectrum.  I wanted to write a book which looked at these issues from an autistic point of view.  The book is for anybody working with children and young people on the autism spectrum – mainstream teachers, teaching assistants, mentors, speech and language therapists, and parents.

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A comic book story to get teenagers talking about sexual consent

Age range:

Ages 13 to 18

Description: 

A comic book story that gets teenagers talking about sexual consent.  It invites them to debate what’s OK and what’s not OK and encourages them to consider other issues surrounding sexual consent, such as toxic masculinity, pornography and sexting. A set of questions and links to useful online videos can be found at the back to fuel classroom discussion.

Click here to download the resource

This learning resource is taken from Pete Wallis and Thalia Wallis’ new graphic novel What Does Consent Really Mean? which follows a group of teenage friends chatting about the myths and taboos surrounding sex and consent.

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The Importance of Talking to Kids About Mental Health

health

Helen Bashford, author of Perry Panda, has experience working in the mental health field, most recently as Carers Lead for a Mental Health Trust, providing support for families. In this article, Helen discusses the need to talk to children about mental health, and the benefits of drip feeding them information. 

We have all heard it by now, that 1 in 4 people will experience mental illness at some point in their life.  This statistic means that every child – every single one – will know someone experiencing mental ill health, if not now then in the future.  There’s also a 25% chance they will become ill themselves.  In families where a parent or sibling is ill, children have to live with the disruption mental illness can cause, and childhood is rife with issues such as bullying that can leave children vulnerable.  Research now shows that half of all mental health problems are established by the age of 14, and 75% by the age of 24 (Mental Health Foundation).  So, when we think about how to prevent mental illness we probably need to think about childhood.

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How To Tell Your Child They Have Autism

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New book Talking With Your Child About Their Autism Diagnosis is a guide to aid discussion and understanding between parents and children. In this blog, edited and adapted from Chapter 3 of the book, author Raelene Dundon breaks down the reasons why she recommends being open and honest with your child about autism. 

child autism

Is it important to tell a child they have autism? Do they need to know? Will they figure it out for themselves? What does the future look like if they don’t know?

These are questions that parents of children with autism may ask themselves many times from the time their child receives their diagnosis, and the answer is not a straightforward one. Depending on who you talk to, there are different opinions on whether it is necessary to tell your child about their autism or not.

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What do you say to the bereaved?

 

In this extract from Grief Demystified, Caroline Lloyd presents a range of scenarios resulting in bereavement, to allow the reader to reflect on the differences that bereaved people experience, thus enabling professionals, family and friends to better communicate with a person who has been bereaved.

Consider why the following are different:

  1. The death of a child
  2. Death within the family structure
  3. Death by suicide
  4. The death of a partner/spouse
  5. The death of a parent
  6. Death by road accident
  7. How death impacts on older people

 

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