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Dementia

Dementia

New Skills for Social Workers

Edited by Alan Chapman and Mary Marshall

Part of the Case Studies for Practice series

Quick Overview

This book explores the new skills needed in multidisciplinary work. These include counselling, creative use of the past, groupwork, empowerment, family therapy, care management, and network analysis. The book is intended to build on what readers already know, while exploring new dimensions of work in the field.
1993, Paperback / softback, 9.21in x 6.14in / 234mm x 156mm, 160pp
ISBN: 978-1-85302-142-8

Availability: In stock

£25.00
OR

Description

Working with people with dementia and their carers is one of the most exciting fields of social work. The dramatic increase in numbers makes it a high priority for health, local authorities, private and voluntary agencies. At the same time, the field offers constantly changing approaches and improving techniques. Multidisciplinary work is needed to such an extent that it challenges all the recent legislation and guidance on community care; new models of services are being tried all the time and it is so free from protocol and procedure that imaginative practice is still very possible. This book, by leading professionals in the field, explores the new skills needed. These include counselling, the creative use of the past, groupwork, empowerment - particularly important in a low status field such as this, family therapy, care management, and network analysis. Also covered is multidisciplinary work. The book is intended to build on what readers already know, while exploring new dimensions of work in the field and introducing new ideas.

Reviews

'We need more books like Chapman and Hall's Dementia that challenge attitudes which see working with older people as an easy option requiring few skills. The book is aimed at social workers, but I think other professionals and volunteers could gain much from reading it... I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn more about dementia itself but also to those who want to develop their skills in working with sufferers and carers.'
- Community Care

'The message that working with people with dementia is rewarding, positive and varied is delivered cogently and powerfully by all the authors... By use of case examples and outline points for discussion, theory and practice are clearly entwined, accessible and easy-to-follow... it would be difficult to over-emphasise the usefulness of this book, particularly for recently qualified social workers, or those newly involved in working with this client group... This book provides an invaluable introduction for those who aim to make reflective and informed practice and integral part of their approach towards this client group.'
- Ageing and Society

'The construction and readability of this book make it useful for medical staff, care managers and students of social work... This type of book opens the door to new ideas. Members of dementia teams will find this book useful and illuminating.'
- Age and Ageing

'Anyone concerned with social work among families coping with dementia will find this book a good resource... a welcome addition to the growing literature now available for social workers on working with people with dementia and their carers.'
- Baseline

'... the book to buy if you want to know more about the range and application of therapeutic skills, and about ways of gaining a closer understanding of the impact of the illness.'
- The Journal of Dementia Care

'This book is a timely contribution to an important field... Social workers and students will find the book of considerable use in their dealing with older people, their families and carers... It is particularly useful in its use of individual case studies.'
- Quarterly Journal of the Christian Council on Ageing

'The strength of the book rests with the author's ability to speak about dementia and integrate social work theory with their direct practice...a positive contribution for new social workers as well as an acknowledgement of the existing work by professionals currently working in the field of dementia.'
- Australian Journal on Ageing

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