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Safeguarding Children from Abroad

Safeguarding Children from Abroad

Refugee, Asylum Seeking and Trafficked Children in the UK

Edited by Emma Kelly and Farhat Bokhari

Part of the Best Practice in Working with Children Series series

Paperback: £21.99 / $34.95

2011, 234mm x 156mm / 9.25in x 6in, 176pp
ISBN: 978-1-84905-157-6, BIC 2: JKSB1 JKSN

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Children from abroad who are alone in the UK are vulnerable and at increased risk of harm without the care and protection of their parents or caregivers. They may be unaccompanied asylum seekers, refugees, or victims of trafficking.

This book examines the issues and problems faced by these children, what their needs are, and how these needs should be met in order to ensure their effective safeguarding. It demonstrates that these children often receive a different level of service to children who are UK citizens, and examines how these gaps in services can be addressed. Chapters cover the identification and age assessment of separated children, accommodation provision, private fostering, mental health, detention and returns, and the role of the guardian. Case studies and best practice points are included throughout the book.

This important book will be essential reading for all those who encounter separated children, including social workers, counsellors, health care professionals and those working in the voluntary sector.

Blog posts

Safeguarding Refugee, Asylum Seeking and Trafficked Children in the UK – An Interview with Emma Kelly and Farhat Bokhari

9 December 2011

"Given the range of experiences that separated children are likely to have had before they arrive in the UK, it seems extraordinary that many will receive a lesser service from statutory services than citizen children. But, as our book shows, those working with separated children have long noted institutional discrimination. Much of this stems from the tensions that exist between immigration control and child welfare and safeguarding. Despite clear domestic policy and procedures, as well as international obligations, many separated children continue to find that their status as subject to immigration control takes precedence over their needs and rights as children."