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Screening for Perinatal Depression

Screening for Perinatal Depression

Edited by Carol Henshaw and Sandra Elliott
Foreword by John Cox

Paperback: £29.99 / $49.95

2005, 234mm x 156mm / 9.25in x 6in, 240pp
ISBN: 978-1-84310-219-9, BIC 2: MMJ MBNC MQCX MQD

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'Henshaw (psychiatry, University of Keele, UK) and Elliott (consultant clinical psychologist, St Thomas' Hospital, UK) provide guidance for health care professionals on the controversies surrounding screening for perinatal depression and on good practice in the use of screening tools. International contributors, with backgrounds in psychiatry, psychology, medicine, nursing, midwifery, and social work, discuss the advantages and drawbacks of the available screening methods, and investigate women's perceptions of the usefulness of screening. Ethnic minority experiences and screening programs in developing countries are also considered.'

- Book News

'The book considers a variety of issues and identifies agreement in ideas and continuing debates. Whether the reader is concerned with women's views of screening, the role of the midwife, screening in the US, Australia or developing countries, screening of women with serious mental illness, Black Caribbean women's views of screening, health visitor intuition and much more, there is something here for them. Each chapter, often drawing on the author's own work, stands on its own. Tutors, researchers, practitioners and students should be able to use the relevant parts to challenge their thinking, reflect on their practice and ask yet more questions about this significant subject.'

- Community Practitioner

Screening for perinatal depression is now widely undertaken in the UK and Europe and is attracting increasing attention. This much-needed text provides guidance for health care professionals on the issues and controversies surrounding screening and on good practice in the use of screening tests.

An international author team with backgrounds in psychiatry, psychology, medicine and nursing has been brought together to discuss the available screening methods, their advantages and drawbacks. The authors investigate women's perceptions of the accessibility and usefulness of screening and of the roles of professionals (e.g. primary care staff and health visitors), and also look at ethnic minority women's experiences of health services. The role of the UK National Screening Committee is explored, along with the problems faced when implementing screening programmes in developing countries.

This comprehensive and practical book will enable mental health professionals, social workers and health visitors to provide sensitive and informed services to women at risk of perinatal depression.